withdrawal method

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Birth Control: Talking ‘Bout The Pullout Generation

When a recent study concluded that nearly 1 in 3 straight, sexually active young women used the withdrawal method for contraception, the media breathlessly coined a neat phrase to characterize these 15- to 24-year-olds: “The Pullout Generation.”

Elite Daily asked: “Gen-Y Or Gen-Pullout? Coitus Interruptus Is The New Form Of Birth Control” and New York Magazine breezily headlined its coverage, “No Pill? No Prob. Meet The Pullout Generation.” The Huffington Post held a forum, asking “Is this an appropriate method of birth control in this day and age?”

youngloveThe truth is, “pulling out” is old news. Indeed, it’s perhaps the oldest form of contraception (besides abstinence) and has been practiced for millennia. Though clearly not the most effective method of birth control, and offering no protection against STIs, withdrawal is free and when done with skill it can be somewhat effective.

According to Planned Parenthood:

–Of every 100 women whose partners use withdrawal, 4 will become pregnant each year if they always do it correctly.
–Of every 100 women whose partners use withdrawal, 27 will become pregnant each year if they don’t always do it correctly.
–Couples who have great self-control, experience, and trust may use the pull out method more effectively. Men who use the pull out method must be able to know when they are reaching the point in sexual excitement when ejaculation can no longer be stopped or postponed. If you cannot predict this moment accurately, withdrawal will not be as effective.

To find out more, I crowd-sourced the issue on SurveyMonkey and asked why my 20-something peers — savvy, educated — relied on such a frowned-upon form of contraception. I got over 30 responses that fell into five overarching categories: Continue reading