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Dementia As A Global Public Health ‘Tidal Wave’

We often think of dementia as a private, intimate hell. A mother no longer recognizes her daughter’s voice. A father rages incoherently at a family dinner.

But it’s worth remembering the global scope of dementia; it’s a looming, worldwide public health disaster, a ‘tidal wave,” as the head of the World Health Organization recently put it, that’s growing worse each year.

This week, the World Health Organization held the first-ever ministerial conference calling for global action against dementia, saying, essentially, enough already, this is something we really need to deal with now.

The WHO’s Director General, Dr. Margaret Chan, offered some sobering perspective in her opening remarks and noted that there are three specific reasons to act now: “Dementia has a large human cost. Dementia has a large financial cost. Both of these costs are increasing.”

According to remarks distributed by the WHO, Chan spoke of dementia, including Alzheimer’s, in dire terms:

“The world has plans for dealing with a nuclear accident, cleaning up chemical spills, managing natural disasters, responding to an influenza pandemic, and combatting antimicrobial resistance. But we do not have a comprehensive and affordable plan for coping with the tidal wave of dementia that is coming our way.”

And the numbers are staggering:

–Dementia currently affects more than 47 million people worldwide, with more than 75 million people estimated to be living with dementia by 2030. The number is expected to triple by 2050.

–Dementia leads to increased long-term care costs for governments, communities, families and individuals, and to productivity loss for economies. The global cost of dementia care in 2010 was estimated to be U.S. $604 billion – 1.0% of global gross domestic product. By 2030, the cost of caring for people with dementia worldwide could be an estimated US $1.2 trillion or more, which could undermine social and economic development throughout the world.

–Nearly 60% of people with dementia live in low- and middle-income countries, and this proportion is expected to increase rapidly during the next decade, which may contribute to increasing inequalities between countries and populations.

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The Good News, Bad News Story On Measles

Back of female with measles/ Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images/flickr

Back of female with measles/ Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images/flickr

By Alexandra Morris
CommonHealth Intern

Lately, when you hear about measles in the news, the reports tend to be grim: outbreaks in 2011 and 2013 in the U.S., parents who are choosing not to vaccinate their children for religious or philosophical reasons. But a new report from the CDC this week paints a bigger – and far more heartening – picture: from 2000 to 2012, 13.8 million deaths were prevented through measles immunizations globally. In other words, a population roughly the size of New England is still alive thanks to the measles vaccine.

Deaths from measles have dropped 78% since 2000. “These figures represent historic lows for estimated measles deaths globally,” said James Goodson, a co-author of the CDC report published in this week’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Since 2000, the Measles and Rubella Initiative – a partnership between various agencies including the CDC and the World Health Organization – has provided over a billion doses of measles vaccinations worldwide.

Measles was eliminated in the U.S. in 2000, but there have been a couple of recent spikes in cases. Just last year, there were three times as many measles infections in the U.S. than in previous years. In raw numbers, that translates to 189 cases, according to the CDC. While that doesn’t seem like a lot, such a highly contagious disease can spread rapidly, especially among people who haven’t been vaccinated.

Countries around the world are also aiming to eliminate measles by 2020 or earlier. Europe, for example, set a goal of measles elimination by 2015. But it doesn’t look like they’re on track to meet that goal, said Goodson. That may be due in part to parents’ fears about the possibility of vaccine side effects.

In 1998, a British medical journal issued a report suggesting the measles vaccine was linked to autism cases, which led to a sharp decline in vaccinations. Although the report was discredited, and later retracted by the journal, parent and anti-vaccine groups continue to fight against routine immunizations.

Misinformation is a major threat to vaccine efforts, say public health officials. Continue reading