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RECENT POSTS

When Hand, Foot And Mouth Disease Sweeps Through: What To Know

(Bob Reck via Compfight)

Veronica Thomas
CommonHealth Intern

Summer is not only the season for watermelon and zucchini. It’s also the time for Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease. Typically found in younger kids, it’s a contagious viral illness marked by a fever and rash — either skin or mouth blisters.

Hand, Foot and Mouth swept through several WBUR employees’ families recently, so we checked in with an expert: Dr. Clement Bottino, a pediatrician at Boston Children’s Hospital in the Division of General Pediatrics who sees a lot of the illness in the Primary Care Center. “Nothing unusual,” he says, “just the summertime viruses.”

“Viruses are kind of like vegetables,” he explains. “There are winter and summer varieties. The winter ones cause illnesses like the common cold, while those in the summer cause fever-plus-rash-type illnesses, like Hand, Foot and Mouth.”

Hand, Foot and Mouth typically affects children under the age of 5, but older children and even adults can catch it as well. Symptoms can vary. Some children may only have a fever and mouth blisters, while others have the characteristic rash without other symptoms. The rash may present with classic red bumps on a child’s hands and feet, or a more diffuse rash that includes the diaper area.

Some people, particularly adults, may show no symptoms at all, but they can still spread the illness to others. Hand, Foot and Mouth is transmitted through direct contact with saliva, mucus or feces. Daycare is notorious as a hotbed of activities for spreading infection: hugging, sharing cups, coughing and sneezing, and touching infected objects. While patients are most contagious during their first week of illness, they can spread the virus for weeks after the symptoms fade.

According to Dr. Bottino, the most important thing for parents to know is that the virus is mild and “self-limited,” meaning it usually goes away on its own, causing no scars or lasting problems. Most patients feel better in seven to 10 days without any treatment at all. I asked Dr. Bottino what else parents should know about Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease. Our conversation, edited: Continue reading

A Surprising New View Of Flu: Rethinking The 1918 Pandemic

Giving treatment to influenza patient at the U.S. Naval Hospital. New Orleans, Louisiana, Circa 1918. (Navy Medicine/Flickr)

Giving treatment to influenza patient at the U.S. Naval Hospital. New
Orleans, Louisiana, Circa 1918. (Navy Medicine/Flickr)

By Richard Knox
Guest Contributor

Ever since 1918, the world has wondered why a novel flu virus touched off an explosive pandemic that killed as many as 50 million people – most of them healthy young adults — and whether it could happen again.

Flu researchers today report some surprising news: They say the 1918 virus was no super-bug. Instead, its deadliness had to do with how very different it was from the flu viruses circulating 25 or 30 years before, when the young adults of 1918 were first exposed to the flu.

Indeed, the new study says it’s that first childhood exposure that determines how people will fight off – or fall prey to – every other flu virus they will encounter in a lifetime.

That’s a very different way of looking at flu, both pandemics and regular seasonal outbreaks.

Much of the current emphasis is on the virus itself. Scientists around the world are doing controversial “gain-of-function” experiments – adding and subtracting pieces of genes from flu strains to see what mutations make some viruses so virulent.

Instead of focusing on flu virus itself, authors of a paper published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences say scientists and public health experts should pay attention to the vulnerabilities of different age groups to any new flu virus – and how those immune gaps might be filled in by targeted vaccine strategies.

“Childhood exposure seems to give kick-ass immunity to that kind of flu virus for many, many decades,” says evolutionary biologist Michael Worobey of the University of Arizona, the paper’s lead author. Continue reading

12 Reasons To Assume Everyone Has Herpes


Responses rolling in to Friday’s post, “Why you should assume everyone has herpes,” have run the gamut from “Yikes!” to “Who cares?” But one common theme is surprise at how incredibly widespread and easy to catch genital herpes is, from “the statistics seem shocking” to “Wow, wish I had known this earlier.”

On the assumption that many people might benefit from getting word now rather than later, here’s a Cliff’s Notes version of Friday’s post, condensed for easier viral transmission:

1. New findings by a pre-eminent researcher on genital herpes highlight that even people who have never had herpes symptoms can “shed” quite a bit of virus and potentially infect others.

2. People with herpes who have never had symptoms shed virus on only about 10 percent of days, the study found. People who have had symptoms spread on about 20 percent of days. But both groups shed about the same amount of virus when they shed.

3. The researcher says that “asymptomatic transmission” may be the central way herpes is spread. In the old days, doctors warned mainly about spreading during an outbreak of sores or lesions.

4. Nearly one-fifth of the American adult population tests positive for genital herpes antibodies.

5. More than 80% of people with herpes don’t know they have it.

6. Overall prevalence by the time people reach their forties is 26%.

7. In the general population, one-fifth of women and 11.5% of men are infected.

8. Among single women between ages 45 and 50, the prevalence rate is between 50 and 70%. That’s according to North Carolina professor of medicine Peter Leone, speaking on NPR’s Science Friday. Continue reading