vaccinations

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How To Talk To Parents Who Oppose Measles Vaccines? We Don’t Know

In this Jan. 29 photo, pediatrician Charles Goodman vaccinates 1-year-old Cameron Fierro with the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine, or MMR vaccine, at his practice in Northridge, Calif. The measles outbreak that originated at Disneyland in December has prompted politicians to weigh in and parents to voice their vaccinations views on Internet message boards. (Damian Dovarganes/AP)

In this Jan. 29 photo, pediatrician Charles Goodman vaccinates 1-year-old Cameron Fierro with the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine, or MMR vaccine, at his practice in Northridge, Calif. The measles outbreak that originated at Disneyland in December has prompted politicians to weigh in and parents to voice their vaccinations views on Internet message boards. (Damian Dovarganes/AP)

Suddenly, measles is political. The Disneyland outbreak has turned the long-simmering issue of parents who decline vaccinations for their kids into a political hot potato, to the point that the New York Times just did a round-up of where potential presidential candidates stand on vaccination. (Classic Hillary Rodham Clinton tweet: “The science is clear: The earth is round, the sky is blue, and #vaccineswork. Let’s protect all our kids.”)

My thought: Great. The topic is already rife with fear and anger and parental conflict, and now we’re adding politics? And I wondered: Is there, in fact, a known way to discuss vaccine resistance constructively? When a pediatrician faces a hesitant parent, or when I encounter a parent in my community who fails to get a child vaccinated?

I asked Dr. Barry Bloom, an infectious diseases expert at the Harvard School of Public Health, who co-authored an editorial in the journal Science — “Addressing Vaccine Hesitancy” — and was also recently featured here: “Talking The Talk On Vaccines.” His reply:

One of the amazing things is that we don’t know the answer to your question. I chaired a meeting at the American Academy of Arts and Sciences on the subject of trust in vaccines. We brought in lots of people — from state governments, doctors — to find the answer to your question: What do we know about how to persuade people that it is in kids’ best interest to protect them against diseases they’ve never seen?

My take is that the answer is two-fold:

One, not everyone is the same. There are a myriad of reasons that people give when questioned about why they don’t vaccinate kids, or delay vaccinations. So there’s no one-size answer that will fit all.

The vast majority of people listen to their doctors — they’re very important — and they do what is recommended because they believe doctors wouldn’t want to harm their kid.

Then there’s a very small group of people who, for a variety of ideological, certainly not scientific, reasons, are opposed in any manner, shape or form to being told what to do, to having government make requirements for school entry, and so on.

The third part of that is people who are responding to discredited publications claiming that vaccines cause bad things to happen. I have to say when I saw one of the physicians in Congress, Rand Paul, say that he had heard vaccines cause neurological or psychological damage, I was absolutely stunned, because there’s no data to support that whatsoever. Continue reading