suicide-crisis-series

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Lessons Learned On The Issue Of Suicide: A Reporter’s Reflections

All this year, WBUR’s Lynn Jolicoeur has been reporting on a public health problem that’s pervasive yet seldom makes headlines: suicide. It claims more than 40,000 lives in the U.S. every year. And about 1 million people attempt to take their own lives.

Lynn spoke with WBUR All Things Considered host Lisa Mullins to share reflections and takeaways from the yearlong project. Listen via the audio player atop this post.

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Tools To Prevent Suicide Include Awareness — And Apps

Optimism is an app that helps people with mental health problems. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

Optimism is an app that helps people with mental health problems. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

About 600 people in Massachusetts take their own lives each year. Between 2003 and 2012, the suicide rate in Massachusetts rose an alarming 42 percent — more than double the increase nationwide — though the state rate dipped slightly in 2013.

At the same time, Massachusetts has one of the lowest suicide rates in the country. But if the numbers are right, 50 people in this state may kill themselves between now and the end of the month.

All this year, WBUR has reported on the issue of suicide. Here, we focus on what’s happening in Massachusetts — especially regarding preventing suicide. Continue reading

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‘Stick Around One More Day’: Message Of Hope After Medford Man’s Suicide

For Marlin Collingwood, Monday, May 5, 2014, started on a high note.

“It was a gorgeous day — a beautiful, perfect, New England May, early day in spring,” Collingwood recalls.

Collingwood’s husband, 45-year-old Gary Girton — who had been battling severe clinical depression for several years — had seemed happy the night before. The two had made dinner together and watched a movie.

But now, with Girton not answering the phone or responding to text messages, Collingwood drove home to Medford from his Boston office to check on his husband. And it became the day he had feared with the deepest of dread. Continue reading

‘Everything Is Grace’: Looking To Faith For Answers To Suicide

In 34 years as pastor of Morning Star Baptist Church in Mattapan, Bishop John Borders has seen it all in terms of life struggles: church members or their loved ones lost to murder; people suffering from addiction, poverty and cancer; grief and trauma from suicide.

“We need one another to survive in these challenging days. You cannot handle all the pressures of life alone,” Borders preached in a sermon earlier this year. “Any man or woman that’s suffering or going through hardship, you are not alone! Christ is suffering with you as you suffer with him!”

Bishop John Borders of Morning Star Baptist Church in Mattapan feels the faith movement has glossed over the pain of those with depression and suicidal feelings. (Robin Lubbock/WBUR)

Bishop John Borders of Morning Star Baptist Church in Mattapan feels the faith movement has glossed over the pain of those with depression and suicidal feelings. (Robin Lubbock/WBUR)

Borders views suicide in a way that would put him at odds with some other clergy.

“I do not see suicide as a sin. I do not think the Scriptures teach that,” Borders says. “Who can really understand what’s going on in the mind and heart spiritually, emotionally, biochemically? None of us really knows.” Continue reading

‘I Don’t See Any Stigma’: Father Fights Suicide In Black Community After Son’s Death

Joseph Feaster Jr. with a portrait of his son Joseph Feaster III. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

Joseph Feaster Jr. with a portrait of his son Joseph Feaster III. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

Joseph Feaster Jr. is not a minister. He’s a successful Boston attorney. But for the last five years he’s been doing a lot of preaching about a subject close to his heart.

“My ministry right now, because it’s even more personal — it involves my son — is around mental health,” Feaster says. “And if I can help the next person to understand it, to get through it, that’s my being.”

His son carried his name and was thereby Joseph Feaster III. He died by suicide in 2010, at the age of 27.

His death came at a triple-decker on Elmore Street in Roxbury, not far from Dudley Square. That’s where he had lived most of his life — first with his parents and sister, and then renting an apartment from his father.

His father recalls lots of times going with Joseph to Horatio Harris Park, less than a block from the family’s home. The elder Feaster doesn’t remember any signs of mental illness in his son as a child.

“No, not at all. I mean, he was a happy kid,” Feaster recalls. “He played here. He climbed the structures here. He would be with his sister and her friends. And he had a great smile.” Continue reading

‘It's No Longer Dark’: Suicide Attempt Survivors Share Messages Of Hope

Mary Esther Rohman tried to take her own life many times when she was younger. But now, she's in a very different place. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

Mary Esther Rohman tried to take her own life many times when she was younger. But now, she’s in a very different place. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

Mary Esther Rohman, of Belmont, knows what it means to hit rock bottom — or worse. As she describes it, the bottom fell out. “They wanted to lock me up in a state hospital and throw away the key as being incurable,” Rohman recalls.

She tried to kill herself many times starting in her late 30s. But thanks to the right depression treatment, self-motivation and a sweet twist of fate, at the age of 67, Rohman is in a very different place.

“When I was 55 I met my soulmate, and I’m so happy!” Rohman says. “You never can tell what life is going to bring you. You’ve got to wait and see what the next chapter is going to be.”

Craig Miller, of Townsend, also knows the dark place of feeling suicidal. “I always had thoughts of suicide since I was 8 years old,” he says. “I always struggled with depression. I always struggled with mental health issues.”

Miller made several suicide attempts. But he recovered, turning his mental suffering into a force to help himself and others.

“It’s no longer dark, and it no longer hurts. And it’s no longer painful, and it no longer has this power over me that it used to have,” Miller reflects. Continue reading

A Life Filled With Promise Is Overpowered By A Complex Web Of Pain And Trauma

Jamie Neal's family -- her father Bob, mother Debbie and brother Abe -- at their church in Duxbury (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

Jamie Neal’s family — her father Bob, mother Debbie and brother Abe — at their church in Duxbury (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

When Jamie Neal was home on medical leave from Williams College in early 2010, her parents were going to great lengths to try to protect her.

“I knew she was suicidal,” says Jamie’s mother, Debbie Neal. “My husband and I decided we would do everything to keep her alive.”

Several months earlier, in August 2009, the Duxbury resident had made a suicide attempt that left her in a coma for several days.

“The last few months before she died, I had her sleep in my bed next to me,” Debbie Neal explains. “And every single day, I asked her on a [scale of] 1 to 10 how she felt and was she suicidal. And she would tell me that she was a 5 and that she wasn’t suicidal.”

In March of 2010, the 21-year-old killed herself in the family’s home. Suicide had become her desperate attempt to escape a complex web of pain and trauma: not only mental illness, but sexual assault and drug addiction — a dark journey in a life filled with so much promise.

CAPTION

Jamie Neal was a member of three varsity sports teams beginning her freshman year at Duxbury High School. She was recruited to play basketball at Williams College. (Courtesy the Neal family)

Like many other survivors of suicide, the Neals recall a loved one who was outwardly happy — even, in Jamie’s case, “outrageously fun.” She had a ready smile.

“Jamie was always, always smiling,” Debbie Neal says. “It kind of defined who she was. She loved other people who were struggling. And she was very kind, and she had a beautiful heart.”

There were some signs early on that Jamie might have mental health issues. A nursery school teacher noticed the normally cheerful, outgoing girl would sometimes withdraw into a sad state. And the straight-A student was a perfectionist in everything she did.

“That perfectionism drove her and motivated her,” says Jamie’s brother, Abe Neal. “On the other hand, I don’t want to say it necessarily did her in. But it was very difficult for her. You would find her at four in the morning editing some minor paper for an English class. And she was also very hard on herself as things started going downhill with herself.” Continue reading

Colleges Work To Prevent Suicide And Fight Stigma Around Mental Health On Campus

A training session for Worcester Polytechnic Institute’s Student Support Network. The group's more than 400 members are trained to intervene and help students dealing with mental health issues. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

A training session for Worcester Polytechnic Institute’s Student Support Network. The group’s more than 400 members are trained to intervene and help students dealing with mental health issues. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

As another academic year winds down, many colleges are reviewing how they raise awareness of mental health issues on campus, and what additional steps they can take to try to prevent suicide among students.

More than 1,000 college students die by suicide every year. Suicide is listed as the nation’s second-leading cause of death for people of college age, though people not enrolled in school take their own lives at a higher rate than those attending college. And research has found about 7 percent of undergraduate and graduate students seriously consider suicide.

Suicide prevention efforts vary greatly among schools. So does the rate of students seeking help from campus mental health services. According to the Association for University and College Counseling Center Directors, college mental health centers see on average about 10 percent of the student body, though mental health providers say the need is much greater. Smaller schools serve a greater percentage of their student body through campus mental health services than large colleges and universities do.

There’s also no consistency in how suicide is tracked in higher education. WBUR reached out to 10 Massachusetts colleges and universities to request information on their suicide rates and suicide prevention programs. Only two, Worcester Polytechnic Institute and Worcester State University, provided data. WPI has experienced one suicide since 2006 (in May 2011) and four in the last 18 years. Since implementing prevention programs several years ago, the school’s suicide rate has dropped below the national average. Worcester State University reports it has had one suicide in the last 10 years.

In the latest installment of our series, “Suicide: A Crisis in the Shadows,” several people involved in and affected by the issue of college suicide prevention joined WBUR to share their thoughts. Below find highlights from that conversation, and listen to it in full above. Continue reading

Related:

After Cluster Of Suicides, MIT Works To Relieve Student Pressure, Raise Awareness

Student climb the steps of the Rogers building at MIT. (Robin Lubbock/WBUR)

Students climb the steps of the Rogers building at MIT. (Robin Lubbock/WBUR)

On a recent sunny spring day, MIT students were lined up at a table grabbing ice cream sundaes, milk and cookies, and, if they were interested, an embrace.

“Yes, giving away ice cream and now hugs,” explained MIT parent Sonal Patel, of Cambridge, as she embraced Miguel Mendez, a native of Mexico who is doing post-doctoral research at MIT.

“It’s always good to know that people around the campus actually care about you as a person,” Mendez said. “This being an institution that expects a lot from you, it can really pass a toll on you sometimes.”

The event was billed as “Stress Less Day,” a chance for people at the university that churns out many of the world’s top engineers and scientists to take a break from problem sets, exams and research.

The snack break was sponsored by the student group Active Minds, which promotes mental health awareness. Volunteers handed out flyers with facts on depression and anxiety, as well mental health resources at MIT.

Active Minds raised awareness about their group during MIT's campus preview weekend for incoming freshman. (Robin Lubbock/WBUR)

Active Minds raised awareness about their group during MIT’s campus preview weekend for incoming freshman last month. (Robin Lubbock/WBUR)

Following six student suicides since March 2014, Active Minds and other student groups have seen increased interest in their events designed to reduce stress, promote a sense of community and reduce stigma.

MIT is not the only higher education institution to struggle with suicide clusters. But the school and its students, widely considered among the world’s most elite, are taking some very open steps to confront the problem. Continue reading

Related:

Federal Mental Health Chief Calls Rising Suicide Rate ‘Unacceptable’

Dr. Tom Insel is a neuroscientist and psychiatrist, and he’s been the director of the National Institute of Mental Health (a division of the National Institutes of Health) since 2002. He recently helped lead the development of “A Prioritized Research Agenda for Suicide Prevention: An Action Plan to Save Lives” with the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention. WBUR’s Lynn Jolicoeur spoke with him about the state of research into and understanding of suicide.

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