substance use disorders

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Opinion: It’s Time To Screen Teenagers At School For Risky Substance Use

By Dr. Eugene Beresin
Guest Contributor

Hearings are being held in the Massachusetts State House on a bill that would enable public school nurses to screen teens for the risk of substance use. This practice is strongly supported by the Children’s Mental Health Campaign and the Addiction Free Future Project, and part of a mission in five states to promote screening for teenagers at risk of substance use problems.

We favor broad screening as a way to reduce death and disability due to substance use that typically starts in the teen years. We understand that this screening will be totally confidential — like all substance use screening and discussions between teens and health care providers. However, parents are free to oppose the screening of their children just as they may prevent their children from receiving vaccinations.

The downside to screening raised by some is that it will bring additional costs to the state, including extra time for training and to administer the tests. In addition, some kids may feel discomfort being asked sensitive questions. However, the overall reduced costs of treatment are great. And most kids really are open to talking about substance use in a confidential setting.

There are certainly some people who do not feel school is a place for screening of any kind. But after looking at research on substance use disorder prevention, professionals at The MGH Clay Center for Young Healthy Minds, The MGH Recovery Research Institute and the Massachusetts Children’s Mental Health Campaign feel that the benefits of early screening far outweigh the financial cost and time factors involved. The risks of excessive substance use in teenage years is very dangerous to brain development and social functioning.

A new blog post by screening advocates John F. Kelly, Ph.D., founder and director of the Recovery Research Institute and associate director of the Center for Addiction Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital, and Courtney Chelo, behavioral health project manager at the Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (MSPCC) lays out the details: Continue reading

Related:

Report Finds Stark Gaps In Mass. Addiction Care

The math is simple and starkly clear.

There are 868 detox beds in Massachusetts, where patients go to break the cycle of addiction. They stay on average one week. Coming out, they hit one of the many hurdles explained in a report out this week from the Center for Health Information and Analysis on access to substance abuse treatment in the state.

There are only 297 beds in facilities where patients can have two weeks to become stable. There are 331 beds in four-week programs.

As the table below shows, there are almost four times as many men and women coming out of detox, with its one-week average, as there are from a two- or four-week program.

From the CHIA report on Access to Substance Use Disorder Treatment in Massachusetts

From the CHIA report on Access to Substance Use Disorder Treatment in Massachusetts

Patients who can’t get into a residential program right away describe a spin cycle, where they detox and relapse, detox and relapse. Some seek programs in other states with shorter wait times.

Continue reading