seasonal affective disorder

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Darker Days: Talk Therapy May Be More Durable Than Light Treatment For Seasonal Affective Disorder

For me, it’s already started: As the darkness descends around 5 p.m., my mood starts to sink too. And it’s not even Thanksgiving.

Victims of SAD, or seasonal affective disorder, a form of depression marked by a dip in mood during the darker winter months, take note: Light therapy may help, but talk therapy may be more “durable” in the long-term.

Researchers at the University of Vermont report that light therapy (essentially, simulating sunrise by sitting in front of a device upon waking that emits high intensity artificial light, around 10,000 lux, for at least 30 minutes) was comparably effective as cognitive behavioral therapy for addressing acute episodes of SAD.

(Lloyd Morgan/Flickr)

(Lloyd Morgan/Flickr)

However, the researchers found that after two subsequent winters nearly half the subjects in the light therapy group reported a recurrence of depression, compared with just over one-fourth of those in the cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) group.

Lead researcher Kelly Rohan, Ph.D. a professor in the Department of Psychological Sciences at the University of Vermont in Burlington, said in an interview that after two winters: “The CBT [patients] maintained their gains better, and we found a more enduring effect of the CBT treatment two years out. Fewer had recurrences of depression and, as a whole, their depressive symptoms were fewer and less intense than people with light therapy.”

Over 14 million Americans suffer from SAD, the researchers report, based on extrapolating a national number from a smaller U.S. sample; prevalence ranges from 1.5 percent of the population in southern states like Florida to over 9 percent in the northern regions of the country.

“There’s no argument that light therapy is a very effective treatment that can substantially improve winter depressive symptomsunder acute conditions, Rohan said in the interview. “But there’s an assumption that people stick to it, and interventions that require effort from people face compliance issues over time.”

The study’s bottom line, she said, is:

“I think the data show that consumers have choices — light therapy is very effective — the question is, ‘Am I willing to stick with it long term and then continue on through the whole winter and pick it up next fall through the winter?’…if so, more power to you. However, if you are willing to consider an alternative, that is CBT, it might be more durable  — you can carry it into the future like a toolbox, you’ve got coping techniques you can use over time.” 

(Full disclosure: Dr. Rohan receives book royalties from Oxford University Press for the treatment manual for the cognitive-behavioral therapy for SAD intervention.)

So how does CBT for SAD differ from therapy for general depression? Rohan says the approach is similar — with a bit of custom tailoring. For instance, the therapist might say something like: “‘We know the dark days are a big contributor to the onset of your symptoms and we can’t control that — we can’t control the sunrise and sunset. But we can control your reaction, and what you think and what you do in response to these light and temperature changes.’ ”

In general, CBT for this condition hinges on reframing the patient’s thinking about the approaching winter — away from a negative attitude about the shorter, darker, freezing, snowbound days, and toward a more positive approach, for instance: What kind of fun, frolicking things can I get out and do in the cold?

“Instead of hibernating and becoming more socially withdrawn,” Rohan said, “we try to get people more engaged in fun winter activities.”

And if you think escaping to the Caribbean will solve your problem, think again: “We don’t endorse jumping on a plane — that’s avoidance, that’s pretending it’s summer when it’s actually winter,” she said. “And dialing the heat up in your home or going to a tanning bed, we don’t advocate for that either — that’s denial, that’s never an adaptive coping strategy. We want people to take winter by the horns.”

Personally, sunshine-filled vacation therapy in winter has worked for me, but Rohan pushed me to rethink this strategy. “When you come back from a trip like that, re-entry can be really jarring,” she said. “Patients feel great when they’re there, when they come back to reality it can really bite.”

Here are some more specifics on the study, published online in the American Journal of Psychiatry, from the UVM news release:

In the study, 177 research subjects were treated with six weeks of either light therapy – timed, daily exposure to bright artificial light of specific wavelengths using a light box – or a special form of CBT that taught them to challenge negative thoughts about dark winter months and resist behaviors, like social isolation, that effect mood. Continue reading

Seasonal Summer Depression: Do You Get It? How Do You Fight It?

A light bulb went on over my head this morning when I read this excellent Huffington Post piece by Therese Borchard, a hugely popular author and blogger on mental illness. I had certainly heard of SAD, Seasonal Affective Disorder, but I thought of it as a winter disease of depression influenced by waning light. It was a revelation to learn that for some of us, summer is SADder.

Therese reports that for about 10 percent of people with SAD, it hits in summer. I’d speculate that many more of us, who wilt in heat and find no real respite during “vacation,” have hints of summer SAD.

Makes sense to me, my friend Barbara responded. “Summer is SO depressing. The problem is that I still have the idea in my head that I should have 3 months off to hang out, go to the gym, read books, etc., even though I haven’t had a summer off in decades. Now summer is just the same as every other time except hotter.”

Therese’s piece doesn’t mention that eternal sense of disappointment as a driver of summer depression, but it gets into a few other factors beyond SAD: Disrupted schedules. Summer expenses. Heat. Body image,

And it offers several tips for fighting the summertime blues: Tweaking the schedule. Sleep. Exercise plans that get around the heat.

Her commenters offered some nice ones, too: Continue reading