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School Lockdown Calculus: The Line Between Preparedness And Trauma

(Cory Doctorow/flickr)

(Cory Doctorow/flickr)

By Dr. Steven Schlozman
Guest Contributor

“If there’s a lockdown and they tell me to go under the table, and there’s a window open next to my desk, I’m going out that window. There’s no way I’m sticking around.”

That’s what a 14-year-old boy recently told me after he was reminded again that with the start of the school year comes as well the now increasingly familiar “lockdown” drill protocols.

Not very long ago, you’d probably have to ask kids what “lockdown drill” meant. Now, however, most kids recognize the term as routine. There’s recess, lunch-time, fire drills and lockdowns. Since the beginning of this school year alone, there have been more than 10 actual school lockdowns across our nation. One, as recently as this week, in New York. Importantly, none of these incidents featured the horrible images that come to mind when we picture nightmares like Sandy Hook or Columbine. A child might think she’s seen a gun in the school, or neighbors nearby might brandish shotguns in the midst of suburban altercations.

In all cases, schools aren’t taking any chances. The lockdown is quickly enacted and, school officials are quick to note, no one gets hurt.

But at what cost? Is there a psychological risk to what has now become routine practice? It’s time that we examine the lockdown and all its potential repercussions.

As a child psychiatrist, I worry a lot about these drills. Schools regularly ask for advice from mental health professionals on these matters, and parents often reach out and ask, understandably, what we ought to do in the setting of the still enormously rare and, at the same time, increasing and enormously traumatic spate of school shootings. The implementation of the mandatory lock down drill at our nation’s schools represents an awful lot of energy and resources and a potentially significant threat to the psychological well-being of our students in preparation for something that still thankfully hardly every happens.

Here are the facts:

•School shootings are horrific.

•School shootings are extremely rare.

•School shootings are increasing (at least according to this FBI analysis).

•Given how rare these events are, one can accurately say that school shootings are in fact increasing at a steady clip.

In other words, if we go hypothetically from one event to four events per year, that’s a fourfold increase even though the overall number of schools without incidents still massively dwarfs the schools that have had to endure a shooter.

•Every parent and every teacher worries about these events.

•Kids, it turns out, seems to worry less about these shootings than do adults.

•Some kids, however, are significantly frightened by these drills. Continue reading