prisons

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Mass. Prisoners Sue For Better Hepatitis Care

Prisoners in Massachusetts are not being given expensive new medications to treat hepatitis C, according to a prisoner rights group that is suing the state, WBUR’s Martha Bebinger reports:

The lawsuit says new drugs that can cure Hep C are now standard care, especially for patients at risk of death from the disease. It’s not clear how many of the 1,500 state prisoners with Hep C are in an advanced stage that would warrant use of the $80,000-90,000 treatment.

But Joel Thompson at Prisoners’ Legal Services says all prisoners are entitled to adequate medical care under the Constitution.

“And the treatment of Hepatitis C, given all the changes that have come, in the treatment of the disease, is no longer adequate. It violates their constitutional rights,” Thompson says.

There is no comment yet from the state or the private group that handles prison medical care.

Here’s the full news release from Prisoners’ Legal Services and the National Lawyers Guild:

Hundreds of prison inmates are in danger of losing their lives because the Department of Correction refuses to provide the medicine that will cure their potentially fatal disease. A class action lawsuit filed in federal court today by lawyers for the National Lawyers Guild and Prisoners Legal Services says it is Massachusetts’ legal responsibility to provide adequate medical care to state prisoners. Urszula Masny-Latos, Executive Director of the Massachusetts chapter of the National Lawyers Guild, said: “It is the responsibility of the state, which spends millions to incarcerate thousands of people, to provide adequate medical care for them. Without such care, many of them will develop serious complications of this disease, and some will die. These people were sentenced to incarceration, not to death.” The lawsuit seeks to compel the Department of Correction (DOC) and its health care contractor, the Massachusetts Partnership for Correctional HealthCare, LLC (MPCH) to provide inmates in their custody with new, lifesaving medications for Hepatitis CHepatitis C, an infectious disease which causes progressive damage to the liver and ultimately liver failure, is widely prevalent in prisons and jails. New medications approved by the FDA in 2014 represent a dramatic improvement over their predecessors, curing nearly one hundred percent of patients, with far fewer side effects. The DOC and MPCH have stopped using the now-outdated medications, but have failed and refused to provide prisoners with the new treatment. Continue reading

Gov. Patrick Issues Emergency Regulations Banning Restraints On Pregnant Inmates In Labor

At a forum on public safety today, Gov. Deval Patrick said the practice of shackling female inmates while they are in labor should end immediately. He said he’s issuing emergency regulations through the state Department of Corrections to ban the practice in all correctional facilities.

Here’s what the governor said (according to a spokesperson, who emailed me his comments):

While on the subject on the use of restraints, let me be clear that we will also end — finally, completely and immediately — the use of restraints on pregnant inmates in labor. Our current regulations prohibit this in state prisons and today the Department of Corrections will issue emergency regulations extending that prohibition to all facilities, including Houses of Correction. Regulation is good but here law would be better. The Legislature is considering a bill that would make this ban the law. I support that bill and I urge the Legislature to send it to my desk for signature this session.

The bill that Patrick referred to has been on file for over a decade, according to Megan Amundson, executive director of NARAL Pro-Choice Massachusetts.

Regarding the governor’s order today, Amundson said: “We applaud the governor for taking this action.”

But, she added, the proposed legislation “is more comprehensive in terms of supporting and also protecting women’s health. The bill protects women’s health throughout pregnancy and labor and postpartum. The regulations ensure that women aren’t shackled during labor but the bill is stronger, and having something in statute is stronger than having something in regulation because it ensures the protection of women’s health going forward.”

In a press release issued after the governor’s announcement, NARAL Pro-Choice Massachusetts said:

…We look forward to seeing the emergency regulations when they are filed later today.

We join the Governor in calling upon the legislature to pass the Anti-Shackling bill (S.2012), currently in Senate Ways and Means, this session to put an end to this practice and ensure that the health of all pregnant women in the Commonwealth is protected. Massachusetts needs to join the 18 states – including Texas and Louisiana – that have already passed laws to ban shackling of pregnant women in jails and state prisons.

The Massachusetts proposal would prohibit the practice and create streamlined laws in both county jails and the state prison system “banning the shackling of pregnant women during childbirth and post-delivery recuperation — unless they present a specific safety or flight risk.”