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To Ease Fecal Treatment, Stool Bank Starts Producing Long-Awaited ‘Poop Pill’

Introducing: the poop pill  (Courtesy of OpenBiome)

Introducing: the poop pill (Courtesy of OpenBiome)

By Gabrielle Emanuel

Fecal transplants may have just gotten a lot easier to swallow.

OpenBiome, the nation’s first stool bank, is beginning large-scale production of a poop pill. This week marks the first time such a pill will be commercially available to hospitals and clinics.

Early tests suggest the pill is highly effective and comparable to traditional, more invasive delivery methods — for instance via colonoscopy, enema or a plastic tube through the nose and into the stomach or intestines.

“Fecal transplants came from what used to be this dark art — where you needed a donor and a blender,” says Mark Smith, research director at OpenBiome and one of its founders. “And now you basically take something out of the freezer and can treat the patient immediately. I’m very, very excited about this.”

Try not to get grossed out because this is an upbeat story. It’s about a very effective medical treatment for a really nasty infection.

Earlier, we reported on fecal transplants and OpenBiome’s struggle to survive.

Founded by MIT students and based in Medford, OpenBiome is just like a blood bank but for poop.

“Fecal transplants came from what used to be this dark art — where you needed a donor and a blender. Now you basically take something out of the freezer and can treat the patient immediately.”

– Mark Smith, OpenBiome research director

It collects healthy poop and then gives it to doctors so they can perform fecal transplants. This procedure is used for patients with recurrent Clostridium difficile or C.diff infections. The bacterium is in the gut and can cause bad — sometimes debilitating — diarrhea.

C.diff sickens hundreds of thousands each year and kills nearly 30,000 people annually in the U.S.

But fecal transplants have proven to be remarkably effective when it comes to C.diff. Technically called Fecal Microbiota Transplantation (FMT), the procedure has been shown to be nearly 90 percent effective in treating C.diff. That’s compared to standard antibiotics, which cure less than 40 percent of recurrent C.diff patients, according to OpenBiome.

This procedure involves collecting stool from a healthy donor and infusing it in the gut of a sick individual. But the catch is that the delivery method is both unpleasant and invasive. Continue reading