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Cigarette Study: Increased Nicotine ‘Yield’ May Make Quitting Even Harder

kenji.aryan/flickr

kenji.aryan/flickr

Fifty years after the U.S. Surgeon General issued the first report on the health hazards of smoking, cigarettes are potentially more addictive than ever, according to a new study that examines so-called “nicotine yields” — essentially the amount of nicotine delivered via smoke.

The study, led by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health and researchers at UMass Medical School, found that nicotine yield “increased sharply from 1998 to 2012 even as the total amount of nicotine in cigarettes has leveled off.”

Public health officials suggest that cigarette makers have cleverly changed the design of their product to increase the amount of nicotine smokers are taking in. (I asked whether the researchers had confronted the tobacco companies directly on these findings. Their response: No, tobacco companies were not directly questioned: “We use the data that they are required to provide to DPH annually,” a UMass Medical School spokesperson emailed.

Here’s more from the news release:

“This study indicates that cigarette manufacturers have recently altered the design of cigarettes. This can significantly increase the amount of nicotine a person receives while smoking,” said Thomas Land, PhD, director of the Office of Health Information Policy and Informatics for the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MDPH) and principal investigator for the study.

“Cigarettes have a more efficient nicotine delivery system than ever before,” Dr. Land said. “Because smokers have no way of knowing that the level of nicotine they are receiving has increased, they can become more addicted more easily without knowing why.” Continue reading