MRI

RECENT POSTS

Childbirth As An Extreme Sport — And Why Its Injuries Can Take So Long To Heal

A study finds some childbirth-related injuries are surprisingly like sports injuries. (popularpatty/Flickr)

A study finds some childbirth-related injuries are surprisingly like sports injuries. (popularpatty/Flickr)

Childbirth, as anyone who’s been through it knows, can feel very much like an extreme sport. And, it turns out, some childbirth-related injuries are surprisingly like sports injuries, including the very long time they need to heal.

That’s the conclusion of a recent study that tracked 68 pregnant women at risk for pelvic injuries and followed up using diagnostic imaging techniques more typically used in sports medicine.

The report by a team of researchers at the University of Michigan found that some women sustain long-lasting pelvic injuries after childbirth — and these aren’t the kinds of injuries that Kegel exercises alone can fix. (For the uninitiated, Kegels are pelvic floor strengthening exercises that involve squeezing and releasing certain muscles.) The research team also found that some childbirth-related injuries may take longer to heal, but ultimately do.

Janis Miller, an associate professor at Michigan’s School of Nursing, and the study’s lead author, says just like elite athletes, new mothers should acknowledge what their bodies have been through.

“If you’ve just run a marathon, it may take longer to heal than if you’ve just run a mile,” Miller said in an interview. “Some women’s birthing experiences are more strenuous than others, so one of the main points is to let women know their bodies will recover…but it can take a long time.”

And while many doctors give new moms the green light to resume normal activities — from sex to exercise — after the standard six-week postpartum exam, the reality is that it can take far longer to feel “normal” again. (I remember dragging my still-sore, depleted body in to that six week follow-up exam, and feeling I was decidedly not good to go.)

Indeed Miller calls the six-week marker for postpartum recovery “arbitrary.” “There is no rationale for that six-week time frame in terms of the body’s responses and healing,” she said.

The study, published earlier this year in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, concludes that a clinical examination alone may not be able to detect the range of pelvic injuries from childbirth; and in certain women, specialized MRI scans may be warranted if there is “unexplained or prolonged pain after delivery,” or other complications, Miller says.

One surprising new finding was related to the types of injuries sustained by the women, who were all at higher risk for pelvic muscle tears because they had a long pushing phase during delivery or they were older women.

Miller said that the conventional wisdom at the start of the study was that postpartum pelvic injuries were primarily nerve-to-muscle or muscle-stretch related, but the researchers discovered that in this higher risk group of women, “one-quarter of them showed fluid in the pubic bone marrow or sustained fractures similar to a sports-related stress fracture, and two-thirds showed excess fluid in the muscle, which indicates injury similar to a severe muscle strain. Forty-one percent sustained pelvic muscle tears, with the muscle detaching partially or fully from the pubic bone.” Continue reading

Why To Exercise Today: Avoid Brain Shrinkage As You Age

MilitaryHealth/flickr

MilitaryHealth/flickr

Middle-age adults take note: the exercise you shirk today may lead to shrunken brain tissue in a couple of decades.

This, according to research presented at the American Heart Association Epidemiology/Lifestyle meeting in Baltimore this week.

After reviewing exercise data taken from more than 1,200 adults who were around 40 years old — a subset of the Framingham Heart Study — researchers found that twenty years later when these same individuals underwent MRI scans, those with “lower fitness levels in midlife also had lower brain tissue levels in later life,” said Nicole L. Spartano, Ph.D., lead author and a postdoctoral fellow at the Boston University School of Medicine.

Though the findings are preliminary, Spartano says it looks like there’s a link between lower fitness levels and faster brain aging. Since the MRI’s in this study were done on people about 58 years old, the researchers didn’t expect to see high rates of dementia, but they did detect “the beginning of shrinkage,” Spartano said. “We look at the brain MRI as an early warning sign for deterioration. This may give us some idea of decreased cognition a decade or so later.”

Specifically, the researchers evaluated fitness based on how the heart changes in the early stages of exercise. Continue reading

First Live Birth Inside An MRI

I figure anything that makes me say “Ullp” out loud is worth posting…Fortunately, the video of the world’s first live birth inside an MRI scanner is really quite tasteful — and I’ve rarely seen such a good illustration of just how much of the mother’s body the baby takes up. This from cnet.com, and the full report is here:

Props to the woman in Germany who this morning became the first ever to give birth inside a magnetic-resonance imaging scanner.
Yes, the prototype scanner was built specifically for labor, and MRIs have been deemed quite safe. But the woman still had to give birth inside one, not to mention wear earmuffs to block out the high-frequency noise. (To protect the newborn’s hearing, the scanner was switched off as soon as the amniotic sac surrounding it opened.)
Woman and baby are both fine, according to gynecologist Ernst Beinder at Berlin’s Charité Hospital, who tells the Daily Mail that the birth was normal and the scanner captured all movements and processes throughout labor: “‘We can now see all the details we previously could only study with probes,” he says.