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Twenty-Four Hospitals Face Financial Penalties For Preventable Readmissions

Hospitals face cuts in Medicaid payments for higher-than-average patient readmissions

Twenty-four hospitals across the state are facing financial penalties because their so-called “potentially preventable readmissions rates,” are too high, according to MassHealth administrators.

The penalties, slated to take effect Oct. 1, are part of the new, 2012 rate contracts between the state and the 65 hospitals who care for MassHealth patients. Hospitals deemed by the state to have too many re-admitted patients will be hit with a 2.2 percent reduction in their standard payment amount per discharge, or SPAD.

Here’s the list (from the state) of hospitals facing the financial penalty:

–BETH ISRAEL DEACONESS HOSPITAL — NEEDHAM
–NASHOBA VALLEY MEDICAL CENTER
–NOBLE HOSPITAL
–MILTON MEDICAL CENTER
–MARLBOROUGH HOSPITAL
–NORTH ADAMS REGIONAL HOSPITAL
–HEYWOOD HOSPITAL
–ANNA JAQUES HOSPITAL
–STURDY MEMORIAL HOSPITAL
–QUINCY MEDICAL CENTER
–MORTON HOSPITAL INC
–ST ANNES HOSPITAL
–CARITAS NORWOOD HOSPITAL
–SAINT VINCENT HOSPITAL
–ST ELIZABETH HOSPITAL
–SOUTH SHORE HOSPITAL
–CARITAS GOOD SAMARITAN MEDICAL
–METROWEST MEDICAL CENTER
–BROCKTON_HOSPITAL
–CAMBRIDGE HEALTH ALLIANCE
–SOUTHCOAST TOBEY HOSPITAL
–TUFTS NEW ENGLAND MEDICAL
–BRIGHAM & WOMEN’S HOSPITAL
–BOSTON MEDICAL CENTER Continue reading

Mass. Hospital Association: February Is Payment Reform Month

JudyAnn Bigby


Many thanks to the Massachusetts Hospital Association’s ever-useful “Monday Report” for catching us up on the state of play of the state’s payment reform. It reports today in part:

FEBRUARY: THE MONTH FOR REFORM

Top Patrick Administration officials met last Wednesday to discuss the governor’s payment reform legislation, which he is expected to release this month. It is anticipated that his legislative proposal will create paths and incentives for the creation of Accountable Care Organizations, and put an emphasis on bundled or global payments as opposed to the prevalent fee-for-service system now in place.

In a Commonwealth Conversations blog posting in January, Health & Human Services Secretary Dr. JudyAnn Bigby hinted at the administration’s current thinking, writing, “The Patrick-Murray Administration supports the formation of … ACOs that will gradually accept more and more responsibility for the overall care of their patients. … Bundled payments, paying a group of doctors within an integrated practice for services and costs related to the treatment of a particular condition, rather than paying each provider piecemeal, show promise in holding down costs while improving coordination.”