IUDs

RECENT POSTS

CDC Report Tracks The IUD Renaissance

You might call it the “Comeback Contraception.” In any case, it seems, IUD use is on the upswing.

This week’s CDC National Health Statistic Report highlights the surge: The number of women using long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) has almost doubled in recent years, and most of the increase is due to the growing popularity of IUDs.

From the report:

Among women currently using contraception, use of LARC increased from 6.0% for 2006–2010 to 11.6% for 2011–2013. Use of IUDs makes up the bulk of this category, with 10.3% of current contraceptors using an IUD during 2011–2013.

The number of women using long-acting reversible contraception has increased from 6 percent in 2006 to 11.6 percent in recent years. (Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

The number of women using long-acting reversible contraception has increased from 6 percent in 2006 to 11.6 percent in recent years. (Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

Intrauterine devices remain less popular than other forms of contraception, according to the report. The pill ranks as the most widely used method (it’s taken by 25.9 percent of women who use contraception, or 9.7 million women), followed by female sterilization (25.1 percent, or 9.4 million women) and the male condom (used by just over 15 percent, or 5.8 million women).

Still, LARC devices, including IUDs and contraceptive implants, were used by 11.6 percent or 4.4 million women, according to the report: “While the most commonly used methods — female sterilization, the pill, and the male condom — appear to remain consistent over time, an increase has been noted in the use of LARC methods, primarily the IUD.”

A confluence of events have contributed to the IUD’s renaissance, experts say, including an improved product, a drop in price and more promotion by doctors, including the American Academy of Pediatrics, and backing by the family of Warren Buffett.

 

Related:

Even Without Warren Buffett, IUDs Have Some Upside

(+mara/Flickr)

(+mara/Flickr)

Don’t miss this fantastic bit of reporting by Bloomberg’s Karen Weise that uncovered the juicy news that through a charitable foundation, Warren Buffett “has become the most influential supporter of research on IUDs.”

It turns out the Buffett-funded foundation paid for myriad studies of the once-shunned type of contraception that is now undergoing a renaissance of sorts. (Shunned, of course, due to the infamous Dalkon Shield, a type of intrauterine device eventually linked to complications, including infertility, infections, even death.)

Here & Now covered the story this week and posted these details:

First, an anonymous donor funded a multi-year study in St. Louis, finding that when given the choice, 75 percent of women chose IUDs or IUDs and hormonal implants. Further, the study revealed that IUDs had over a 99 percent effectiveness rate — in addition to being extremely safe. That study was written up in 50 medical journals, and was also used to promote extensive initiatives in Colorado and Iowa, where an anonymous donor funded low cost IUDs, as well as training programs for medical professionals on IUD use and counseling. In Colorado, the results showed the teen birth rate dropping by 40 percent. Finally, with the evidence of the IUD’s safety and effectiveness indisputable, the anonymous donor funded the development of a new, low-cost IUD known as Liletta.

Well, it turns out that the anonymous donor, in every case, was the Susan Thompson Buffett Foundation — a philanthropic organization funded by its founder billionaire Warren Buffett.

OK, so Buffett has long been a supporter of expanding access to contraception. Does that mean the IUD should not be given a second look? We’ve written a fair amount on this topic: Carey wrote about her own IUD here, and also offered a thoughtful, news-you-can-use post, “10 Reasons To Get An IUD, And 5 Downsides.” Continue reading

Word To Pediatricians: IUDs And Implants Top Choices For Teen Birth Control

From a Planned Parenthood video on the IUD (YouTube)

From a Planned Parenthood video on the IUD (YouTube)

By Veronica Thomas
Guest contributor

When a teen girl tells her pediatrician she’s thinking about having sex, the response is often a brief talk about abstinence, a handful of condoms, and a referral to the family planning clinic across town.

But a new recommendation makes pediatricians likelier to discuss the whole gamut of birth control methods—with IUDs and hormonal implants topping the list.

Released today by the American Academy of Pediatrics, the recommendation says doctors should discuss a broad range of birth control options with sexually active teens, but should start with the methods that protect against pregnancy best: long-acting reversible contraceptives, which include the hormonal implant, copper IUD and two hormonal IUDs.

Teen pregnancy rates have dropped dramatically over the past two decades to a record low, but the U.S. still has one of the highest rates among developed countries: more than 750,000 pregnancies each year. Though most sexually active teens use some form of birth control, they rarely pick the most effective methods and often use them incorrectly—whether it’s missing a few doses of the pill or accidentally tearing a condom.

“It’s sort of a set-and-forget method.”

– Heather Boonstra, Guttmacher Institute

Because IUDs and implants don’t rely on any action from the user, they’re a particularly good fit for teens, says Heather Boonstra, Director of Public Policy at the Guttmacher Institute.

“It’s sort of a set-and-forget method,” she says. Once inserted by a trained professional, an implant or IUD can last from three to ten years, and will be over 99 percent effective. The implant is a matchstick-sized rod inserted in the upper arm; the IUD is a small, T-shaped device placed into the uterus.

Their use has been rising for years in the general population. From 2002 to 2009, implant and IUD use nearly doubled among women overall. But while use of these long-acting methods has also been increasing among teens, less than five percent of all teen contraceptive users currently choose them.

That’s because most teens have never even heard of the implant or IUD, says Boonstra. Continue reading