insomnia

RECENT POSTS

For Menopause-Related Sleep Problems, Study Suggests Trying Acupuncture

If you’ve reached menopause and just can’t sleep like you used to, you might want to learn about a special spot on your body. No, not that one. It’s the Sanyinjiao acupoint, or Spleen 6 — a small area just above the ankle on the inside of the leg. New research suggests that for women with menopause-related sleep problems, acupuncture, particularly on that point, may offer relief.

(Fairy heart/Flickr)

(Fairy heart/Flickr)

Among the myriad discomforts that afflict menopausal women, sleep problems may not get as much attention as hot flashes. But all manner of sleep disturbances — from waking up at the crack of dawn unable to fall back asleep to full blown insomnia — are pervasive among this demographic.

Researchers report that the prevalence of menopause-related sleep disturbances ranges from 8.4 to 56.6 percent. Estrogen deficiency contributes to the problem; nocturnal hot flashes are also sometimes a factor.

In the new review, a meta-analysis of more than 30 clinical trials involving 2,433 participants published in the journal Obstetrics and Gynecology, researchers in China found a “substantial association” between acupuncture and improved sleep in peri-menopausal and post-menopausal women. Specifically, the researchers say they demonstrated “that the association of reduction in menopause-related sleep disturbance and acupuncture was correlated with changes in serum estradiol levels particularly when the Sanyinjiao acupoint was stimulated.” (Estradiol is the estrogen mostly produced from the ovaries, and can also be used to treat peri-menopausal symptoms.)

The researchers theorize that the elevated serum estradiol levels may be the key to why acupuncture could help alleviate the sleep disturbances.

There are caveats: the researchers report an association only between acupuncture and a decrease in sleep disturbances; also, sleep quality assessments were mostly based on patients perceptions; in addition, the researchers report that their analysis only looked at articles in English and Chinese, which might limit the generalizability of the review.

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Study: For Sleep Problems In Older Age, Try Mindful Meditation

(Fairy Heart/flickr)

(Fairy Heart/flickr)

Insomnia is insidious, infuriating and often debilitating.

For anyone who has suffered with eyes-wide-open at 4 a.m. it’s not terribly surprising that more and more Americans (particularly older people and women) are being prescribed serious drugs to help them sleep.

But these medications, known as benzodiazepines, have been linked to numerous health problems, ranging from an increased risk of dementia, to car crashes and falls. And once you’re on them, it’s hard to stop, as I can attest from personal experience. While debate continues over the safety and effectiveness of these medications, a small study suggests that an alternative approach may offer some relief.

Research published online by JAMA Internal Medicine found that a practice of mindful meditation — basically just focusing on breathing and remaining in the present moment while observing your thoughts easily drift by — may help certain people with sleep problems. “Mindfulness meditation practices resulted in improved sleep quality for older adults with moderate sleep disturbance…” the report concludes.

The study, by researchers at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, reflects a growing body of evidence showing that the practice of “mindful meditation” can be used as a low-cost, non-drug intervention that can, in certain cases, reduce stress and help with other physical and mental health woes.

Here’s more from the JAMA release:

Sleep disturbances are a medical and public health concern for our nation’s aging population. An estimated 50 percent of individuals 55 years and older have some sort of sleep problem. Moderate sleep disturbances in older adults are associated with higher levels of fatigue, disturbed mood, such as depressive symptoms, and a reduced quality of life… Continue reading

Study: Insomnia Linked To Heart Disease Deaths In Men

New research says anti-anxiety and insomnia drugs can increase the risk of death

As if it weren’t bad enough that insomnia in and of itself can be torture. New research just out in the journal Circulation suggests that insomnia may increase a man’s chances of dying from heart disease — though just modestly.

The study adds yet another incentive for the estimated one-third of Americans who suffer from insomnia to work on sleeping better. It comes on the heels of other findings that curing your insomnia could double your chances of recovery from depression.

From the Brigham and Women’s Hospital press release on the Circulation study:

“Insomnia is a common health issue, particularly in older adults, but the link between this common sleep disorder and its impact on the risk of death has been unclear,” said Yanping Li, PhD, a research fellow in the Channing Division of Network Medicine at BWH and lead author of the paper. “Our research shows that among men who experience specific symptoms of insomnia, there is a modest increase risk in death from cardiovascular-related issues.”

Specifically, researchers report that difficulty falling sleep and non-restorative sleep were both associated with a higher risk of mortality, particularly mortality related to cardiovascular disease.

Researchers followed more than 23,000 men in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study who self-reported insomnia symptoms for a period of six years. Beginning in 2004 through 2010, researchers documented 2025 deaths using information from government and family sources. After adjusting for lifestyle factors, age and other chronic conditions, researchers found that men who reported difficulty initiating sleep and non-restorative sleep had a 55 percent and 32 percent increased risk of CVD-related mortality over the six year follow up, respectively, when compared to men who did not report these insomnia-related symptoms.

More Angst For The Anxious: Study Says Meds Can Increase Death Risk

New research says anti-anxiety and insomnia drugs can increase your risk of death

Axe the Ativan. Flush the Sonata.

A new study finds that people who take anti-anxiety and insomnia drugs have a 36 percent higher risk of death compared to those who don’t. It’s a “small but significant increase,” in risk, researchers conclude, but troubling enough to think twice before downing that Xanax.

“These medications aren’t candy,” says Geneviève Belleville, Ph.D., an adjunct professor at the University of Laval in Quebec and lead author of the study, which analyzed 12 years of data on more than 14,000 Canadians. Dr. Belleville suggests patients consider non-drug treatment for anxiety and sleep problems, such as cognitive behavioral therapy which has been shown to be effective, rather than instantly reaching for a pill.

There are a number of theories on why taking these types of drugs might increase mortality. Tranquilizers and sleep aids can take a toll on alertness and reaction time and can lead to serious accidents. They can also inhibit or aggravate breathing problems during sleep. And as central nervous system inhibitors, they may affect judgement and possibly increase the risk of suicide, researchers say.