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Word To Pediatricians: IUDs And Implants Top Choices For Teen Birth Control

From a Planned Parenthood video on the IUD (YouTube)

From a Planned Parenthood video on the IUD (YouTube)

By Veronica Thomas
Guest contributor

When a teen girl tells her pediatrician she’s thinking about having sex, the response is often a brief talk about abstinence, a handful of condoms, and a referral to the family planning clinic across town.

But a new recommendation makes pediatricians likelier to discuss the whole gamut of birth control methods—with IUDs and hormonal implants topping the list.

Released today by the American Academy of Pediatrics, the recommendation says doctors should discuss a broad range of birth control options with sexually active teens, but should start with the methods that protect against pregnancy best: long-acting reversible contraceptives, which include the hormonal implant, copper IUD and two hormonal IUDs.

Teen pregnancy rates have dropped dramatically over the past two decades to a record low, but the U.S. still has one of the highest rates among developed countries: more than 750,000 pregnancies each year. Though most sexually active teens use some form of birth control, they rarely pick the most effective methods and often use them incorrectly—whether it’s missing a few doses of the pill or accidentally tearing a condom.

“It’s sort of a set-and-forget method.”

– Heather Boonstra, Guttmacher Institute

Because IUDs and implants don’t rely on any action from the user, they’re a particularly good fit for teens, says Heather Boonstra, Director of Public Policy at the Guttmacher Institute.

“It’s sort of a set-and-forget method,” she says. Once inserted by a trained professional, an implant or IUD can last from three to ten years, and will be over 99 percent effective. The implant is a matchstick-sized rod inserted in the upper arm; the IUD is a small, T-shaped device placed into the uterus.

Their use has been rising for years in the general population. From 2002 to 2009, implant and IUD use nearly doubled among women overall. But while use of these long-acting methods has also been increasing among teens, less than five percent of all teen contraceptive users currently choose them.

That’s because most teens have never even heard of the implant or IUD, says Boonstra. Continue reading