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Culture Clash: U.K. Embraces Homebirth As Best For Some Women

Sarah Parente shortly after the homebirth of her daughter Fiona (Courtesy of Leilani Rogers)

Sarah Parente shortly after the homebirth of her daughter Fiona (Courtesy of Leilani Rogers)

By Jessica Alpert

Sarah Parente, an Austin, Texas-based doula and mother of four, gave birth to her first child in the hospital with no complications. But then she decided to make a shift: Parente delivered her next three babies at home. “For women with low-risk pregnancies, home birth can be a great choice,” she says. “You have less stress because you are in your own home surrounded by a birth team of your choosing.”

Though home birth has recently gained cache in the U.S. — with some celebrities trumpeting the benefits of having their babies at home  — the practice remains uncommon and the majority of pregnant women give birth in a hospital setting. Still, Parente may be getting a little more company, albeit slowly. Data released by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) earlier this year shows the rate of homebirths in the U.S. has increased to 0.92 percent in 2013 and the rate of out-of-hospital births (including home) has increased 55 percent since 2004.

Experts in the United Kingdom are saying that’s a good thing.

The London-based National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (Nice) recently released recommendations that homebirths and midwife-led centers are better for mothers and often just as safe for babies as hospital settings, the BBC reports. Of the 700,000 babies born in England and Wales each year, nine out of 10 are born in obstetric-led units in hospitals. Continue reading