gynecological cancer

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Questioning Ovarian Cancer: Why Such A High Fatality Rate?

Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons

There is tragic news coming from the entertainment world today.  Pierce Brosnan announced that his daughter, Charlotte, age 41, died of ovarian cancer three days ago.  This is the same illness that took her mother’s life in 1991 when she, like her daughter, was in her early 40s.

Angelina Jolie – who underwent a preventative double mastectomy earlier this year —  lost her mother to ovarian cancer in 2007.

According to the CDC, ovarian cancer is the second most common gynecological cancer, after uterine cancer, and it’s the cause of more deaths than any other gynecological cancer.

The numbers look like this: ovarian cancer kills 15,000 women and approximately 22,000 new cases are diagnosed annually in the US.  Approximately 90% of cases occur in women over 40 and the majority of diagnoses are given to women aged 60 years or older.   According the the American Cancer society, the survival rate for patients who live for five years after they are diagnosed with ovarian cancer is 44%.

Unlike breast or cervical cancer, there is no reliable screening measure for ovarian cancer.  Once it is detected, the first line treatment option is surgery.

Earlier this year, The New York Times reported on a study that suggested the high fatality rate amongst ovarian cancer patients is attributable to widespread deficiencies in the typical treatment most women receive. The article reports that only a third of women with ovarian cancer receive “best practice” treatment, which the study says, is a complicated and intensive operation performed by a highly specialized surgeon.

Here is an excerpt from the article:

Cancer specialists around the country say the main reason for the poor care is that most women are treated by doctors and hospitals that see few cases of the disease and lack expertise in the complex surgery and chemotherapy that can prolong life.

If we could just make sure that women get to the people who are trained to take care of them, the impact would be much greater than that of any new chemotherapy drug or biological agent,” Continue reading