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Study: Could Bro Or Sis Affect Weight More Than Mom Or Dad?

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Veronica Thomas
CommonHealth Intern

My adolescence was a blur of rushing from school to dance classes with my older sister. After hours of practice, we couldn’t wait to get home and make berry smoothies that we’d slurp from the blender. My sister and I did almost everything together.

A new study suggests this relationship may have played a key role in keeping me healthy and fit.

The study, released online by the Journal of Preventive Medicine, found that siblings may have a greater influence on a child’s risk of obesity than parents do. Specifically, having an obese older sibling is associated with more than double the risk of being obese compared to having an obese parent. The association is even greater among siblings of the same gender.

It may seem obvious that family members influence a child’s chances of being obese, but the importance of the type of family relationship has been less clear. This new study, led by Dr. Mark Pachucki at the Mongan Institute for Health Policy at Massachusetts General Hospital, is the first to compare the influence of sibling obesity and parent obesity on a child’s obesity risk.

Dr. Pachucki and his team surveyed almost 2,000 only-child and two-child families from the larger Family Health Habits Survey. One parent from each family reported on the food environment, physical activity, weight and height for themselves and their children. The researchers also considered and analyzed the parents’ socioeconomic status, demographic background and overall health. Continue reading