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When Nursing Homes Are No Longer The Last Stop For Patients

Two years ago, Dorothy Holmes, then 75, was in the cozy pink bathroom of her mobile home getting ready to shower when she fell. It’s the type of accident that’s pervasive among older Americans — and it’s often the very thing that triggers the end of independence.

“I got a big spot on my head, it almost conked me out,” Holmes said in her soft voice.

She heard her husband come down the hall, “and when he turned the corner all I heard was, ‘Oh God, honey, what did you do now?’ After that I don’t know anything cause I passed out,” Holmes recalled.

Dorothy Holmes shortly after her fall. (Courtesy)

Dorothy Holmes shortly after her fall. (Courtesy)

Holmes spent almost three months in a hospital near her home in Belchertown, Mass. Her heart stopped a few times, she had breathing and memory problems, and doctors removed an ulcer as big as a grapefruit. Even with continuous nursing care, the wound wouldn’t heal.

“Every day the girls came in and changed it and cleaned it. Then I had to take,” Holmes paused, “what do you call it when they help you learn to walk and everything?”

Physical therapy — which continued for more than a year in a nursing home. These days, patients are often transferred from a hospital to a nursing home to recover. But some never leave.

“The only thing I worried about was not getting out. I kept saying to him and one of my daughters, ‘You’re not going to keep me here are you?’ ”

Holmes worried her children and her husband wouldn’t be able to handle her care at home. Continue reading