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Virtual Check-Ups: The Doctor Will See Your Online Responses Now

(Medisoft via Compfight/Flickr)

(Medisoft via Compfight/Flickr)

Veronica Thomas
CommonHealth Intern

Like many patients with chronic conditions, Lesley Watts used to come in to the doctor’s office for a check-up on her digestive disorder every 12 months. This not only meant time spent in traffic and scouring for a parking spot, but also the brain fog and stress of answering her doctor’s questions on the spot.

But a year ago, when it was time for her visit, she instead  received an email reminder to pull up an online form that asked her everything her doctor needed to know about her symptoms. From the comfort of her recliner, Watts carefully answered the questions, among them: “Overall, how have your reflux symptoms been since your last office visit?” “How much have your symptoms affected your work, social, and/or home life?”

When she was satisfied with her responses, she clicked “submit.” The next day, she received instructions from her doctor about how to manage her symptoms better. Visit complete. And patient satisfied.

“It asked me questions that I had never been asked before, and as a consequence, I learned about symptoms I had not recognized,” she remembers. “I believe I received better care because I was able to take my time and provide more accurate answers.”

“We believe that it can actually increase your engagement with the system because you’re thinking about your condition outside of the physician’s office.”

– Dr. Ronald Dixon

Virtual care and tele-medicine are hot health topics, replete with weighty promises of revolutionizing healthcare. But they often refer to realtime video-chatting or texting with a clinician—whether it’s your personal provider or a random doctor overseas.

The Massachusetts General Hospital service that Lesley Watts participated in aims to conduct virtual visits without the realtime interaction.

Instead, patients complete an online questionnaire for their specific conditions, and send it to their personal doctor—whom they already know and trust—for review and response. For the past two years, primary care clinicians at an MGH Beacon Hill practice have been using over 30 different forms to follow up with some of their adult patients.

According to Dr. Amy Fogelman, a physician at the Beacon Hill practice, the clinical questionnaires are especially useful for chronic conditions that need management over time, like obesity and hypertension. In fact, the obesity questionnaire has proven more effective at helping patients lose weight than any other method she’s tried, she says. Continue reading