Disneyland outbreak

RECENT POSTS

One Doctor Asks: Why Are We Arguing About Measles Vaccines In 2015?

By Dr. Rebecca Weintraub
Guest Contributor

This week, as I juggled work, family and shoveling, I prepared a lecture on promoting equity in health delivery. My first slide is a picture of the Ebola virus, and as of this morning, my last slide is a map of the ongoing measles outbreak. That’s because this week, we’ve heard a clear public health message from both President Obama and Surgeon General Vivek Murthy: Vaccines are safe and effective.

Why is this message being repeated in 2015?

As a mother and physician, I am dismayed that all Americans are not practicing this guidance based on evidence from 40 years ago. Vaccines are safe and effective. There is no link between vaccines and autism.

In 1757, Dr. Francis Home proved the infectious nature of measles and detected the virus in blood. The highly contagious virus spreads via droplets and replicates within the newly infected person for 14 days. The symptoms include high fever, red eyes, runny nose and cough. A few days after the onset of these symptoms, “Koplick’s” spots—bluish markings on the inside of the cheek—appear. Then, a rash starts at the head and travels to the feet. The infected person is contagious for four days before and after the onset of the rash. We test suspected cases for antibodies against the virus. After confirmation, the treatment is supportive, including rehydration, nutritional support, medicines to reduce fever, antibiotics for superimposed infections, and Vitamin A supplementation. Once the measles infection has taken hold, there is no cure.

We’ve made tremendous strides in the discovery and development of new vaccines. In 2000, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention declared the measles virus eliminated. But now, there are over 100 confirmed cases of measles across 14 states. Our most vulnerable populations are at risk of contracting an entirely preventable disease. This is not only an issue of choice, but an issue of health equity and our role as global citizens.

So now we can, and must, eradicate measles… again. We can learn from Mississippi and West Virginia, which have been at the forefront of new vaccination efforts. Continue reading

Why The Current, Post-Eradication Measles Outbreak Is So Infuriating

Back of female with measles/ Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images/flickr

Back of female with measles/ Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images/flickr

That certain parents refuse to get their kids vaccinated isn’t new. But suddenly, it’s news. And it’s troubling. I’m a big supporter of “crunchy” parenting, but not when it puts other people’s children (and mine) at risk. The current measles outbreak has infuriated many parents and medical professionals who, fuming, wonder why we are arguing about a virus that was already eliminated here in the U.S. 15 years ago.

So, here’s one such parental rant on the topic by Alicair Peltonen, an administrative assistant at the Harvard School of Public Health and a journalism student at the Harvard Extension School.

By Alicair Peltonen
Guest Contributor

When I was in elementary school, one of my favorite books was called “The Value of Believing In Yourself,” by Spencer Johnson, MD. It was part of a children’s book series meant to teach lessons through the life stories of historical figures. The Value of Believing In Yourself was about Louis Pasteur and his quest to develop the rabies vaccine.

That book still stands as my most cherished source for the science of immunity. Even with a bachelor’s degree in biology, a career spent working in scientific and medical research and a current job in the immunology department of a prestigious graduate school, I still picture all viruses as scruffy black blobs with scary pink faces and foaming fangs. And vaccines are the steadfast soldiers in uniform with huge mustaches and bayonets that are sent in to get the bad guys. How on earth could anyone be more scared of the soldiers than the black blobs?

I have kids. I know all about fear. Those first days with my oldest daughter were magic, but it was a dark magic. It came with visions of this tiny creature I was now in charge of falling off my lap as I breast-fed or rolling face-first into a crib bumper. I imagined a hundred ways she could be injured or worse — and I imagined all the ways it would be my fault.

I went straight to my local Isis Maternity (a wonderful organization that no longer exists) and signed up for new mommy classes. Those classes were an education for me, not in what to do as a new parent, but what not to do. All the women I sat criss-cross applesauce with were lovely, caring, engaged moms who were genuinely searching for the best way to rear happy, healthy child. And every single one of them was irrationally afraid of one thing. And those “things” were all different. Continue reading