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A Bittersweet Graduation For Patients At The Mass. Hospital School

Brian Devin, CEO of The Massachusetts Hospital School, speaks with student Miguel M. in the cafeteria after lunch. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

Brian Devin, CEO of The Massachusetts Hospital School, speaks with student Miguel M. in the cafeteria after lunch. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

By Gabrielle Emanuel

CANTON, Mass. — It’s lunch break and there’s a wheelchair traffic jam in the school hallway.

Friendly shouts of “Beep! Beep!” and “You’re blocking traffic” interrupt chatter about one kid’s new backpack and another guy’s birthday plans.

It’s a typical school scene, except a bunch of the kids are using computers to talk and others breathe through ventilators.

Like students across the country, many of these kids are getting ready for graduation. It’s a bittersweet time for graduates of all stripes, but perhaps nowhere is it more bittersweet than here.

All of the 91 students in these hallways are also patients. When they graduate – as about a dozen will this year – they’re not only leaving their friends and teachers, they’re leaving the hospital they’ve called home for years, and in some cases, a decade or more.

The campus’ main entrance is on a rural road in Canton, where a flashing sign reads: The Massachusetts Hospital School.

Brian Devin, the CEO, says that when cars zip past drivers often “think it’s a school where they teach people to work in hospitals.”

Devin says it’s a fair assumption, but completely wrong. This facility is part pediatric hospital, part elementary and secondary school. It serves children with severe disabilities — muscular dystrophy, cerebral palsy, brain injuries — and is run jointly by the state Department of Public Health and the Department of Education.

Children as young as 6 or 7 can be admitted to the hospital and they often stay at this lakefront campus until the kid’s clock strikes 22 years old, when it’s time to graduate and it’s time to go, regardless of whether there is another alternative place to go.

A Non-Institutional Hospital

As the hallway traffic starts moving, the students wheel themselves out into the brisk spring air. They race down covered ramps toward horseback riding lessons, speech therapy sessions and wheelchair hockey practice.

Those white ramps create a web that connects all the brick buildings on this idyllic, 160-acre facility.

“The kids are all over the place. They are not always with staff — we don’t want them to always be with staff,” Devin says. “We want them to be with themselves and with other kids as much as possible. There is no real institutional flavor.”

The Massachusetts Hospital School’s ultimate goal is to cultivate as much independence as possible for these children. Continue reading