delirium

RECENT POSTS

More On ‘Sundowning,’ And The Agitation That Can Grip Seniors After Dark

(edward musiak/Flickr)

(edward musiak/Flickr)

Our post last week on “sundowning” — a syndrome in which seniors’ behavior changes dramatically after dark — generated an outpouring of stories from patients, caregivers and people working in hospitals, in hundreds of comments on Facebook.

Many brought up the fact that delirium and sundowning are related. While sundowning is thought to happen in elderly patients with advanced dementia, many people described seeing sundowning in others — like a relative after surgery. While experts aren’t sure how much sundown syndrome and delirium overlap, they agree that not everyone who gets confused at night is sundowning.

Delirium is very common and also gets worse at night. So the first time someone experiences delirium they should be checked for underlying and reversible causes like infections or mind-altering medications.

People also pointed out that sundowning can happen at home as well as in the hospital. For people with severe dementia like Alzheimer’s, this is especially true.

Some commenters referenced “The Visit,” a recently released horror movie where two children are visiting their elderly grandparents who exhibit erratic and violent behavior each night. I haven’t seen it myself, but it seems to be taking the concept to the extreme in the most frightening way possible.

Many of the stories on Facebook were particularly moving. We thought we’d share a few: Continue reading

Earlier:

‘Sundowning’: Why Hospital Staffs Dread Nightfall, And How To Help Seniors Avoid It

By Dr. David Scales

The elderly woman had been normal all day, my colleague told me, tolerating it well when a tube was placed in her bladder to measure her urine. But that evening, she was found wandering the hospital halls yelling in Italian, carrying her urine bag under her arm thinking it was her purse, traumatized that hospital staff were trying to take it away.

Another night in the hospital, a female Sri Lankan colleague saw an elderly man who was convinced she was a Nazi soldier. Reassurances and even a plea from the doctor — “How could I be a Nazi? I have brown skin!” — could not persuade him otherwise. The next day the patient was back to normal, incredulous when told about what transpired the night before.

An 80-year-old man — I’ll call him Bill — came to our emergency room after a fall. He seemed fine and his tests were negative, but his family wanted him admitted over night for observation. That evening, he began shouting out, repeatedly wanting to get up and walk to the bathroom (forgetting he had just gone). Our calming efforts only riled him up more.

This erratic nighttime behavior is called “sundowning.” Staff in hospitals and nursing homes always worry what will happen as twilight approaches. As the sun sets, many elderly patients can change drastically: They can become extremely confused, agitated, not know where they are, and even hallucinate. In other words, they exhibit signs of delirium, a confused state that can lead them to do things they otherwise wouldn’t.

Ulrich Joho/Flickr

Ulrich Joho/Flickr

Thankfully, not every elderly patient sundowns, but when one does, it can be emotionally traumatizing for everyone. To be confused or hallucinate, or to see a relative acting out in irrational ways, is frightening and destabilizing. Yet, sundowning seems to be extremely common. So, what is it? Why do people sundown? And what can you do to minimize the risk of sundowning in yourself or a close friend or relative?

Experts agree that confusion and agitation are more common in the evening and at night. But there is surprisingly little scientific consensus on what sundowning actually is.

The debate is in how much sundowning and delirium are related. Some experts think they’re the same thing, others separate but related entities.

It’s hard to study sundowning without a clear definition and diagnostic criteria. Experts can’t even be sure how often it happens. A recent review found a rate of anywhere from 2.4 percent to 66 percent. Continue reading

Delirious: Study Finds Simple, Humane Fixes For Aged, Disoriented Patients

(Xavi Talleda/Flickr)

(Xavi Talleda/Flickr)

By Alison Bruzek
Guest Contributor

The patient was an older man, living at a nursing facility. He’d originally been admitted to the hospital for surgery to treat a urinary tract infection. But now, lying in his bed at the hospital after the operation, he was convinced that two people were standing outside his room and planning to blow it up.

“We could tell this person was delirious,” says Dr. Eyal Kimchi, a neurologist at Massachusetts General Hospital

Delirium is a complicated syndrome, most common among the hospitalized elderly where it’s estimated 29 to 64 percent of patients have it. However, it’s underreported and researchers estimate as many as two-thirds of cases go undiagnosed.

While usually temporary, it leaves people feeling severely confused. Their brains switch rapidly between mental states, increasing their risk of falling and later brain problems like dementia.

Though the patient’s mind was muddled, the idea of an explosion hadn’t appeared to him out of the blue — he was at the hospital around the time of the Boston Marathon bombing. What had likely happened, says Kimchi, is the patient had begun misattributing the news reports he saw playing on the television to actual life.

And even though that patient fully recovered, some of those delirious thoughts remained. “Ultimately this person said, ‘I know I’m better, I know I was confused, but I also know they were trying to blow up the place,’ ” says Kimchi.

People with delirium can often run the gamut of states, from hyperactive and aggressive to withdrawn and nearly comatose. The causes are not well understood but it’s a combination of a person’s predisposition to delirium as well as an event that sets it off, says Kimchi. These could be “surgery, infections, other sorts of brain injuries like trauma,” he says. “It’s still very hard to predict on an individual basis.”

While there’s not a lot of research on the predictors of delirium, there are ways to prevent it, according to a study released this week in the Journal of the American Medical Association Internal Medicine.

Prevention may be as simple as reminders and attentive care, says, Dr. Tammy Hshieh, a researcher of aging and geriatrics at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and author of the JAMA study. She suggests preventative measures like reorienting patients to where they are, keeping them hydrated and healthy, and ensuring they have hearing aids or glasses or other physical assistance is an effective method to stop delirium. Continue reading