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New Podcast: Kids, Contact Sports And ‘Getting Your Bell Rung’

(Clappstar/Flickr Creactive Commons)

(Clappstar/Flickr Creative Commons)

If my son ever wants to play tackle football, my response will consist of four simple words: “Over my dead body.” (With perhaps the addendum: “Your brain is too precious to turn it into swiss cheese.”)

Thankfully, he has expressed no interest. But what if he did? And what about the concussion risks of other sports?

Happily, our regular CommonHealth contributors, Drs. Gene Beresin and Steven Schlozman, Massachusetts General Hospital child psychiatrists and excellent mental health communicators, have just created their first “What’s On Your Mind?” podcast. And their five-minute conversation addresses this very topic: Should my kid play contact sports? The podcast series is part of their public outreach mission at the new Clay Center for Young Healthy Minds.

Listen to the full podcast here. How often do you get to hear one psychiatrist call another “a shrimp”? But mainly, the information comes from solid sources — the CDC, concussion experts — and the upshot is clear: Kids shouldn’t start contact sports until age 14, according to the latest recommendations, because neck muscles get much stronger in adolescence and that helps protect the brain from impact. And the biggest takeaway: If a child take a significant head hit — if he “gets his bell rung,” as Dr. Schlozman’s football coach used to put it — he should be sure to sit out at least the rest of the game. Every concussion raises the risk for another concussion. When can he get back in? “Leave it up to their physician,” Dr. Schlozman says.

But all these new findings and warnings about concussions do not mean kids should avoid sports altogether. “They’re a huge part of growing up,” says Dr. Schlozman, who, at age 12, wandered over and sat on the opposing team’s bench after his own bell had been rung. “And as long as we’re careful, there’s no reason not to have fun.”

From the blog post that accompanies the podcast: Continue reading