cesarean section

RECENT POSTS

Why A U.S. Obstetrician Says Some Women May Be Better Off Having Baby In U.K.

Despite the fact that we all go through it, birth remains a fraught topic. Everyone, it seems, has an opinion on the ideal place, position and method of childbirth, and those views can be unshakable.

Into this prickly arena steps Dr. Neel Shah, an obstetrician at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston and assistant professor at Harvard Medical School. In a smart, nuanced and provocative opinion piece in the current New England Journal of Medicine on the cultural and systemic differences between giving birth in the United Kingdom compared to the United States, Shah suggests what might seem like heresy to some in his field: “The majority of women with straightforward pregnancies,” he writes, “may be better off in the United Kingdom.”

Dr. Neel Shah (Courtesy)

Dr. Neel Shah (Courtesy)

Why write about this now? The U.K.’s National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) recently issued new guidelines saying that healthy women with uncomplicated, low-risk pregnancies are “safer giving birth at home or in a midwife-led unit than in a hospital under the supervision of an obstetrician.” When the recommendations came out, Shah notes, “eyebrows went up. The New York Times editorial board (and others) wondered ‘Are midwives safer than doctors.’ How can hospitals be safer than homes?”

Before you, too, reject Shah’s conclusion out of hand, consider the careful thinking behind it and the larger context, which is that one in three births are now carried out by cesarean section — major abdominal surgery — and that C-sections are the most commonly performed surgery on the planet. But Shah’s argument focuses more on the vastly different medical cultures involved: “At its core,” he writes, “this debate is not about the superiority of midwives over doctors or hospitals over homes. It is about treatment intensity and when enough is enough. Nearly all Americans are currently born in settings that are essentially intensive care units: labor floors have multi-paneled telemetry monitors, medications that require minute-by-minute titration, and some of the highest staffing ratios in the hospital. Most labor floors are more intensive than other ICUs in that they contain their own operating rooms. Surely, every birth does not require an ICU.”

I asked Shah to lay out the key points of his piece. Here they are, edited:

RZ: Why do you conclude that it may be safer for women to give birth in the U.K. rather than the U.S.?

NS: I think the biggest takeaway from this piece is that there are harms from doing too much just like there are harms from doing not enough and that’s a big paradigm shift in U.S. health care. Childbirth is one of the biggest illustrations of that: We err on the side of overdoing it and for the healthy majority, we end up causing a lot of harm from overdoing it in the interest of making it safe for the high-risk minority.

People think that C-sections are like a rip cord — they are if you are truly at risk. But if you are low-risk, C-sections have a lot of bad consequences. Major complications such as hemorrhage, severe infection and organ injury are three times as likely to occur with cesarean deliveries as they are with vaginal deliveries. But even more fundamentally: you could go home with a 12-centimeter incision with a newborn or you could go home without a 12-centimeter incision and a newborn….moms are resilient so they just deal with it but that has a major impact. Continue reading

What To Expect When You’re Birthing At Home: A Hospital C-Section (Possibly)

Screen shot 2015-03-20 at 9.07.11 AM

By Ananda Lowe
Guest Contributor

The term “homebirth cesarean” didn’t exist before 2011, when Oregon mother and student midwife Courtney Jarecki coined it. But now, a Google search returns almost 2,000 entries on the topic.

The term refers to a small but emerging community of mothers who have experienced the extremes of birth: They’d planned to have their babies at home, but ended up in a hospital, most often in the operating room having a cesarean section, major abdominal surgery. Needless to say, the effect of such a dramatic course change takes a toll, and can often be overwhelming.

(“Homebirth cesarean” can also refer to births that were planned to occur at a freestanding birth center outside of a hospital, but eventually were transferred to the hospital for a cesarean.)

How often does this happen?

Home births, though a small fraction of the approximately 3.9 million births a year in the U.S., are on the rise. Based on the most recent birth data from the National Center for Health Statistics, “the 36,080 home births in 2013 accounted for 0.92% of all U.S. births that year, an increase of 55% from the 2004 total.”

Eugene Declercq, a professor of community health sciences at Boston University School of Public Health, studies national birth trends. He said in an email that while there are no nationwide numbers on homebirth transfers to the hospital, “the studies that have been done usually report about a 12% intrapartum transfer rate.”

But beyond the numbers, what happens emotionally when your warm and fuzzy image of natural childbirth in the comfort of home suddenly morphs into the hard reality of a surgical birth under fluorescent lights?

A woman who'd planned a homebirth but ended up having a cesarean in the hospital. (Photo courtesy: Courtney Jarecki)

A woman who’d planned a homebirth but ended up having a cesarean in the hospital. (Photo courtesy: Courtney Jarecki)

Jarecki founded the homebirth cesarean movement to figure that out. She connected women who, like herself, shared the experience of giving birth through full surgical intervention, despite their original plans of having their babies at home or outside of the established medical system.

In Jarecki’s case, she labored at home for 50 hours until her midwives detected a rare complication known as a constriction ring, or a thickened band of tissue in her uterus that was impeding progress. Shortly after this, meconium appeared, and Jarecki knew it was time to go to the hospital. Her emotional response to the intensity of the situation, however irrational, was one of anger, shame and failure at her ability to give birth normally. A cesarean followed.

Over the next several years, Jarecki began helping other homebirth cesarean mothers emerge from the silence and shame they felt confronting their unexpected surgeries. Some of these women also report that their postpartum recovery was tougher because their unique needs were not adequately addressed by their home birth midwives or their hospitals.

Jarecki started by launching a (now busy) Facebook page as a support group for these mothers and their health care providers.

Childbirth Expectations vs. Reality

Rule number one in childbirth is that it rarely unfolds as you expect. Continue reading

Globe: C-Section Rates Reflect Hospital Subcultures

A doctor wonders how to stop the relentless rise in c-sections


Dr. Adam Wolfberg, an obstetrician at Tufts Medical Center, has an insider’s insight into the factors that make a hospital’s Cesarean-section rate high or low.

He does a wonderful weaving job in the latest Boston Globe magazine: from his own patient in a tricky delivery situation; to Cambridge Hospital, where the C-section rates are among the lowest in the state; to Holy Family Hospital in Methuen, where the rates are high. Some of the cultural and logistical factors that influence the rates may surprise you. What surprised me even more was this striking scene from a conference, given how much hand-wringing we tend to hear about C-section rates:

At a recent Las Vegas conference on obstetrical safety, some 125 members of the audience were asked to raise their hand to indicate their personal C-section rate. “Less than 15 percent?” the speaker asked. Two hands in the large auditorium went up. “Fifteen to 30 percent?” Half the hands were up. “More than 30 percent?” The rest. Then the speaker asked the room, “How many of you care?” No one raised a hand, and the room broke out in laughter.