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Armpit Fat? There’s A YouTube Video For That

By Jessica Alpert

Did YouTube kill the video star?

That’s what some fitness-types are saying. Consumers can access exercise programs of all stripes. From old-world Jack LaLanne to ’80s Jane Fonda, from Insanity to the current YouTube HIIT (high intensity interval training) sessions — the American fitness diet continues to evolve. At the moment, it’s all about free and on-demand.

When Cassey Ho made her first YouTube exercise video, she had her pilates students in mind. Thirty of them. It was 2009 and Ho had recently moved from California to Boston to try a career in fashion buying. A few months later, she checked in on that YouTube video and there were thousands of views.

So she decided to make more.

The Blogilates App allows users to search for fellow "POPsters" in their area. (Courtesy of Cassey Ho/Blogilates)

The Blogilates App allows users to search for fellow “POPsters” in their area. (Courtesy of Cassey Ho/Blogilates)

By 2011, Cassey Ho was posting one video a week, calling her unique brand of pilates “POP Pilates,” essentially pilates to pop music. She named her channel “Blogilates” and an empire was born. Today, Cassey Ho was 1.8 million subscribers to her YouTube channel — 60,000 page views a day and 8 million views a month.

Ho credits humility as key to her success. “I think the reason for it’s [Blogilates] growth is the fact that I love teaching. I genuinely want to help people.”

Reach people she does — Blogilates is now the top fitness channel on the network. Ho also has a book deal, a DVD release and more original designs from her clothing line in the works for 2015.

YouTube has become the DIY video destination, from cupcakes to cosmopolitans, appliance repairs and yes — ab workouts — there’s a video for every problem. Even armpit fat. Huge audiences combined with social media savvy has made the everyday people who dole out this advice into celebrities. “People cry and shake and get crazy when they see me,” says Ho. She occasionally does tours to give live classes around the country. “When you go to Blogilates meet-ups, there are hundreds of people there and I get to hear their stories…and how these videos helped them battle eating disorders, lose a ton of weight. They are so positive and kind — they don’t mind having to wait five hours in line to meet me. They make me want to work harder.”

And it’s these young enthusiastic fans that are driving the YouTube content bonanza. In the first quarter of 2014, according to Nielsen, consumers aged 18-24 viewed 2 hours and 28 minutes of online videos per week — that’s nearly an hour more than the average for all adults.

Cassey Ho isn’t alone. There’s the two friends behind “Tone It Up,” Elliot Hulse who creates videos like “Exercise for Heartbreak and Pain,” and the husband and wife team behind “Fitness Blender” (known simply as Daniel and Kelli). Daniel and Kelli started their channel in their garage — in fact they still record videos there.

According to OpenSlate, a video analytics platform that analyzes all ad-supported content on YouTube, Fitness Blender averages around 8 million views per month. In an introduction video, Daniel explains that they started their channel because they “there weren’t any fitness websites out there that actually focused on fitness — they were all about make-up, all about clothes, all about what you look like — not about what you do.” Kelli adds that “everyone should have access to health fitness information regardless of their income or access to a gym.”

Tolga Ozyurtcu, a clinical assistant professor in the department of kinesiology and health education at the University of Texas at Austin, says the YouTube brand of exercise is more “personalized and more personal.

“In the past, the marketplace of exercise television or videos had to be more middle-ground…the new stuff is hyper-focused.” Continue reading