birth defects

RECENT POSTS

CDC: Certain Antidepressants, But Not All, Taken During Pregnancy May Raise Birth Defect Risk

The debate over whether or not it’s safe to take antidepressants during pregnancy is heated, with extreme emotions — and conflicting research studies — on both sides.

But a broad new analysis led by researchers at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention came to a fairly measured conclusion when comparing pregnant women who took SSRIs — a class of antidepressants — to women who did not take those medications during pregnancy.

The analysis suggests that certain serious birth defects occur 2 to 3.5 times more frequently among babies born to mothers taking the antidepressants Prozac or Paxil early in pregnancy. But the researchers also conclude that for pregnant women taking other SSRIs, such as Zoloft, the data “provide some reassuring evidence” that earlier studies linking the drug with specific birth defects could not be replicated.

The analysis of 17,952 mothers of infants with birth defects and 9,857 mothers of infants without birth defects was published in The BMJ.

“What our paper really adds, is that we can now offer women more options,” said Jennita Reefhuis, an epidemiologist with the CDC’s National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities and the study’s lead author. Reefhuis said that since Zoloft (sertraline) was the most common SSRI taken among the women, “it was reassuring that we could not replicate the five earlier links with birth defects.”

In an interview, Reefhuis said: “The main message is that depression and other mental health conditions can be very serious and many women need to take medication to manage their symptoms. So women who are pregnant, or thinking of becoming pregnant, shouldn’t stop or start any antidepressants without speaking to a health care provider.”

The issue, she added, isn’t clear cut, but highly dependent on each individual woman and a very personal calculation of risks versus benefits. “We are trying to find the nuance here,” Reefhuis said. “It is really important that women get treated during pregnancy. Their illness doesn’t stop the moment they get pregnant. Women need options.”

It’s also important to retain perspective when evaluating risk, Reefhuis said, noting that in every pregnancy there is already a 3 percent risk of a birth defect. Continue reading

Painkillers? Prozac? Brazilian Blowout? Hotline Counsels Pregnant Women On Risks

(Tatiana VdB/Flickr/Creative Commons)

(Tatiana VdB/Flickr/Creative Commons)

Joy Shapiro of Framingham, Mass., was the sort of hyper-cautious expectant mother who doesn’t just cut out alcohol and caffeine. She worried about the ingredients in everything she consumed or put on her body, from fitness drinks to sunscreen.

But thanks to a referral from her obstetrician, she had a secret weapon against her anxiety: Patricia Cole, the program coordinator for MotherToBaby Massachusetts — also known as the Pregnancy Exposure Infoline — whom she “bombarded” with queries.

“At one point, I emailed her like 20 ingredients that were in my face cream to say, ‘Are any of these going to be a detriment to my pregnancy?’” Shapiro says. “You’re essentially living for two, and you want to make sure you’re not doing anything that could harm your child.”

Cole helped Shapiro navigate not just food and cosmetics but medications — prescription steroids, acid reflux, nasal sprays. The sorts of decisions that have become commonplace, nearly universal, in a country where 9 out of 10 pregnant women take at least one medication during pregnancy, and 7 out of 10 take a prescription drug.

“Less than 10 percent of approved medications have enough data to show what, if any, concerns there are for fetal effects.”

– Dr. Cheryl Broussard, CDC

Many of the old concerns about risky exposures during pregnancy — leaded paint, thalidomide — have faded, but in this nation of prescription-fillers, meds have become a major worry.

Last year, the CDC launched its Treating for Two Website, part of a national initiative aimed at making medication use during pregnancy safer. It seeks better research on the effects of meds during pregnancy, and better guidance for expectant mothers and their doctors. The agency warned just last month about the potential risks of opioid painkillers — such as codeine or oxycodone — for pregnant women.

“Really, the problem is that we just don’t know a lot of information,” says Dr. Cheryl Broussard, a CDC expert on medication use during pregnancy. “We know that up to 9 out of 10 pregnant women take at least one medication during pregnancy, but less than 10 percent of approved medications have enough data to show what, if any, concerns there are for fetal effects.”

Clinical trials on drugs seeking approval generally do not include pregnant women, or drop women if they become pregnant. Continue reading