acupuncture

RECENT POSTS

For Menopause-Related Sleep Problems, Study Suggests Trying Acupuncture

If you’ve reached menopause and just can’t sleep like you used to, you might want to learn about a special spot on your body. No, not that one. It’s the Sanyinjiao acupoint, or Spleen 6 — a small area just above the ankle on the inside of the leg. New research suggests that for women with menopause-related sleep problems, acupuncture, particularly on that point, may offer relief.

(Fairy heart/Flickr)

(Fairy heart/Flickr)

Among the myriad discomforts that afflict menopausal women, sleep problems may not get as much attention as hot flashes. But all manner of sleep disturbances — from waking up at the crack of dawn unable to fall back asleep to full blown insomnia — are pervasive among this demographic.

Researchers report that the prevalence of menopause-related sleep disturbances ranges from 8.4 to 56.6 percent. Estrogen deficiency contributes to the problem; nocturnal hot flashes are also sometimes a factor.

In the new review, a meta-analysis of more than 30 clinical trials involving 2,433 participants published in the journal Obstetrics and Gynecology, researchers in China found a “substantial association” between acupuncture and improved sleep in peri-menopausal and post-menopausal women. Specifically, the researchers say they demonstrated “that the association of reduction in menopause-related sleep disturbance and acupuncture was correlated with changes in serum estradiol levels particularly when the Sanyinjiao acupoint was stimulated.” (Estradiol is the estrogen mostly produced from the ovaries, and can also be used to treat peri-menopausal symptoms.)

The researchers theorize that the elevated serum estradiol levels may be the key to why acupuncture could help alleviate the sleep disturbances.

There are caveats: the researchers report an association only between acupuncture and a decrease in sleep disturbances; also, sleep quality assessments were mostly based on patients perceptions; in addition, the researchers report that their analysis only looked at articles in English and Chinese, which might limit the generalizability of the review.

Continue reading

Could Stressed-Out Rats Hold Clues To How Acupuncture Works?

Could rats subjected to chronic stress — their paws dunked in icy water — hold the key to how acupuncture works? And could all those needles, traditionally thought to unblock the flow of life energy, in fact be calming the body’s stress response?

That’s what Ladan Eshkevari, a licensed acupuncturist, physiologist and associate professor of nursing at Georgetown University School of Nursing theorizes after treating a group of stressed-out rats with acupuncture. In a study published recently in the Journal of Endocrinology, she found that the treatment actually lowered levels of the rat-equivalent of cortisol, a stress hormone, as well as other proteins and hormones secreted by biologic pathways involved in the stress response.

(SMercury98/flickr)

(SMercury98/flickr)

“Our study is one of the first…to show how acupuncture works on chronic stress,” she said. Understanding the ancient Chinese practice on a molecular level, she adds, might make it more acceptable in a mainstream Western medicine context.

Rats, of course, are rats; they’re mammals, sure, but they don’t always behave like people. Still, Eshkevari’s hypothesis is that rats and humans may be comparable when it comes to their response to chronic stress. She posits that acupuncture works by quieting a key pathway — the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis — that drives the production of critical stress hormones in the body. Cortisol in high levels has been linked to depression, anxiety, cardiovascular disease, insomnia and other conditions.

More than 3 million adults in the U.S. use acupuncture each year, according to the National Institutes of Health, yet “there has been considerable controversy surrounding its value as a therapy and whether it is anything more than placebo.” Despite numerous studies reporting its benefits for chronic pain, stress and other conditions (and the fact that it’s been used for over 2,500 years across Asia) experts says there’s no clear understanding of how, exactly, it works. Continue reading