abortion rights

RECENT POSTS

Buffer Zone Ruling Aftermath: Street Scene At Clinic, New Bill Filed

Outside the Planned Parenthood clinic in Boston. (Photo: B.D. Colen)

Outside the Planned Parenthood clinic in Boston on Saturday. (Photo: B.D. Colen)

The 35-foot “buffer zone” outside the Planned Parenthood clinic on Commonwealth Avenue in Boston is gone, struck down by the Supreme Court’s buffer-zone ruling last month. But a bill filed today in the Massachusetts Legislature would restore some added protections to staff and patients at the state’s reproductive health centers.

Among them, Planned Parenthood writes, is police power to issue a “dispersal order” when a group has impeded access to a facility; a prohibition on using “threat or force to intentionally injure or intimidate” someone trying to enter or leave the facility; and a “clear passage” section that bans impeding anyone trying to come or go.

An opinion piece in the Boston Globe today argues that no anti-abortion protester has ever been arrested for committing violence, and that the buffer zone “restricts and punishes not violence but expression.”

The author might want to take a look here on socialdocumentary.net at the evocative photos shot at the clinic on Saturday by B.D. Colen, a former Pulitzer Prize-winning medical reporter who teaches documentary photography at MIT. True, no physical violence. But you can imagine what it’s like to be a desperate young woman who has to navigate through dozens of protesters and “counselors” to get into the clinic.

The photo set’s “Photographer’s Statement” includes a heart-wrenching letter from a former student of Colen’s, who speaks to the emotional effects of laws and rulings that can make an agonizing time even harder. An excerpt:

“No one gives us – young and old women – enough credit about how terrifying that whole process is – with or without protestors. When they changed the laws to force a woman to look at the sonograms before they’d do the procedure, I cried. I remember being asked if I wanted to see the sonograms – I remember saying no and meaning it. I’m glad that at the time my voice was heard and my opinion was respected. What a cruel unnecessary law. What a lack of understanding that law demonstrated…

“I wish I was in Boston right now. I’d sit out there on that street after work or on my weekends.

“People think that women who have unwanted pregnancies are stupid or careless. That’s so far from the truth that I want to laugh instead of cry. I wasn’t stupid or careless – and even if I was, that shouldn’t matter. Women’s bodies are built to get pregnant. No birth control is 100% effective. I always knew my body was a fighter and stubborn as hell. Now I have concrete proof.
Continue reading

AP: Supreme Court Strikes Down Buffer Zone For Abortion Clinics

(Update from the AP: “Attorney General Martha Coakley, whose office argued before the justices to keep the 35-foot zone, did not immediately say whether officials would seek to create a different buffer zone or take some other steps. But she said the ruling appeared to leave open other alternatives and called on lawmakers to act quickly.

“Every day that we don’t change the rules and make it safer for people to get access, people are put at risk,” said Coakley, a Democratic candidate for governor.

Senate President Therese Murray, D-Plymouth, said she expected lawmakers to act before the July 31 end of the legislative session, but would not speculate on what changes might be sought.”)

The AP reports that the U.S. Supreme Court today struck down a 35-foot protest-free zone outside abortion clinics in Massachusetts (read the court’s “slip opinion” here). We’ll update the news and add reactions as they come in, but for now, here’s the Associated Press, with reactions below:

The justices were unanimous in ruling that extending a buffer zone 35 feet from clinic entrances violates the First Amendment rights of protesters.

Chief Justice John Roberts said authorities have less intrusive ways to deal with problems outside the clinics.

While the court was unanimous in the outcome, Roberts joined with the four liberal justices to strike down the buffer zone on narrow grounds. In a separate opinion, Justice Antonin Scalia criticized Roberts’ opinion for carrying forward “this court’s practice of giving abortion-rights advocates a pass when it comes to suppressing the free-speech rights of their opponents.”

The case began when Boston-area grandmother Eleanor McCullen and other abortion opponents sued over the limits on their activities at Planned Parenthood health centers in Boston, Springfield and Worcester. At the latter two sites, the protesters say they have little chance of reaching patients arriving by car because they must stay 35 feet from the entrance to those buildings’ parking lots.

Planned Parenthood provides health exams for women, cancer screenings, tests for sexually transmitted diseases, birth control and abortions at its clinics.

The organization said that the buffer zone has significantly reduced the harassment of patients and clinic employees. Before the 35-foot zone went into effect in 2007, protesters could stand next to the entrances and force patients to squeeze by, Planned Parenthood said. Continue reading

The GOP’s Anti-Abortion Agenda

The GOP hopes to defund Planned Parenthood

In case you missed it, February has been anti-abortion rights month for Republicans in Congress: they’re pushing an agenda that includes defunding Planned Parenthood, reducing money for family planning and other related actions. The proposals led U.S. Rep. Barbara Lee, a California Democrat, to describe the campaign as a “war on women.”

Here’s a Kaiser Health News guide to the Republican’s plan to greatly reduce funding for abortion services, and so-called Title X money.

Reproductive health advocates such as Families USA, Planned Parenthood and NARAL Pro-Choice America argue that eliminating or restricting access to Title X money would cut off vital financial support for health centers that are providing care at steeply discounted rates for low-income patients. According to Adam Sonfield, a senior public policy associate at the Guttmacher Institute, Title X money gives clinics the flexibility to invest in things like outreach and infrastructure—something Medicaid payments don’t account for. The institute also estimates that the contraceptive services offered at Title X centers prevent 973,000 unintended pregnancies each year.